+0
Hello. I'm sayaka.

I'm confused about the meaning difference between "no more adj. than" and "no adj.."
I tried to find the answer here, but I couldn't. So I ask you a question.

-----------------------------------------------

Is there a difference between the two sentences below. Please give me an answer.
#1: This mountain is no more high than Mt. A. ( Mt. A is 200 meters. Everyone thinks it is not high. )
#2: This mountain is no higher than Mt. A.

-----------------------------------------------
My understanding NOW is this.

#1 means:
Mt. A is not high (BUT NOT LOW*), and this mountain is not high (BUT NOT LOW), either."
* At least, you do NOT say "Mt. A is low" because it is not very important now. 

#2 means:
This mountain is as low as Mt. A. So, Mt. A is low, and also this mountain is low.

And NEITHER #1 NOR #2 means "This mountain is the same height as Mt. A."

Is that right?
-----------------------------------------------

Thank you.
sayaka
March 24, 2009
+0
sayakaIs there a difference between the two sentences below. Please give me an answer.
#1: This mountain is no more high than Mt. A. ( Mt. A is 200 meters. Everyone thinks it is not high. )
#2: This mountain is no higher than Mt. A.
Sayaka:
#1 is not grammatically correct.
#2 is grammatically correct. It means that the mountain might be the same height as Mt. A, or maybe a bit lower. It does not say anything about how high Mt. A is.

We use this expression when there is some uncertainty about the comparative heights.
For example: For years, K2 was thought to be no higher than Mt. Everest. Recent satellite measurements confirmed that its peak is a few hundred feet lower.
[EDIT]
Forms of #1 can be OK if the comparative form of the adjective is not made by adding -er.
Example: She was no more beautiful than other girls her age, but certainly more graceful.
Comments  
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thank you for replying.

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

I have found an explanation for "no more adj. than" and "no adj.."
Originally, the explanation and example sentences are written in Japanese (so, I translate). Like the below.

There is a big difference of the meanings between "no more ... than" and "no adj.."
"A no more ... than B" is used when you want to make someone understand the thing that is difficult to understand, using a plain example. And this does NOT mean that the level of height/beauty of A is the same as the level of B.
"No adj+er/more+long-adj. than" is used when you want to say that the level of height/beauty of A is the same or nearly the same as the level of B.

Ken is no more tall than Tom (is).
= Ken is not tall any more than Tom.

This means that everyone knows Tom is not tall, and you want to say Ken is not tall.
Ken is no taller than Tom (is).
= Ken is as short as Tom.
Both Ken and Tom are short, and  Ken's height is (nearly) the same as Tom's.

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

The explanation above is wrong?
Your answer (Ms. AlpheccaStars' answer) says that "Ken is no more tall than Tom (is)." has gramaticaly error, right?

Thank you.
The rule you state is exactly the same rule. = "no + (comparative form of the adjective) + than"
The reason is how we make the comparative of adjectives. Adjectives with one syllable (and sometimes 2) add -er.
tall -> taller
big -> bigger
high -> higher
pretty -> prettier
lovely -> lovelier

Adjectives with 3 or more syllables (sometimes 2) do not change, we just precede them with the word "more"
beautiful -> more beautiful
colorful -> more colorful
charismatic -> more charismatic

So I can say the following:
Ken is no taller than Mike. (Ken is not taller than Mike - he is either the same height, or shorter.)
Mike is no more charismatic than Ken. (Mike is not more charismatic than Ken, he is equal or maybe less charismatic)

A baseball is no bigger than a softball. (A baseball is not bigger than a softball - it is either the same size or smaller)
A softball is no harder than a baseball. (A softball is not harder than a baseball - it is either the same hardness or softer)
Roses are no more colorful than orchids. (Roses are not more colorful than orchids. They are equally colorful, or maybe less colorful)

"more tall", "more big", "more hard," etc. are not correct, unless they are used with a noun, and not used in a comparative way. For example
You can't have any more big hamburgers! Superman jumped over more high buildings than anyone else. I picked some more pretty flowers from the garden.
Thank you for always answering my question.

I've understood. Thank you very much.

sayaka
April 1st 2009
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies