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I have read the following paragraph from http://www.cnn.com/2010/TECH/03/31/broadband.south.korea/index.html?hpt=Mid .
The context is why the U.S. Internet is slower and pricier than many of the developed countries, especially South Korea.

"Faris, of the Berkman Center, said no one society has a stronger appetite for Internet connectivity than another. Korea's government simply has whetted that appetite, and provided the incentives to make high-speed connections accessible to a large segment of society."

My question is how do I parse the sentence "no one society has a stronger appetite for Internet connectivity than another"?

I guess "one society" logically means any society excluding South Korea. But then what is "another", South Korea?
I'm befuddled.
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Hi,

I have read the following paragraph from http://www.cnn.com/2010/TECH/03/31/broadband.south.korea/index.html?hpt=Mid .

The context is why the U.S. Internet is slower and pricier than many of the developed countries, especially South Korea.

"Faris, of the Berkman Center, said no one society has a stronger appetite for Internet connectivity than another. Korea's government simply has whetted that appetite, and provided the incentives to make high-speed connections accessible to a large segment of society."

My question is how do I parse the sentence "no one society has a stronger appetite for Internet connectivity than another"?

Here's the basic idea.

(No society in the world) has a stronger appetite for Internet connectivity than (another society in the world).

In oher words, every society wants it equally.

I guess "one society" logically means any society excluding South Korea. No.

But then what is "another", South Korea?

I'm befuddled.

Best wishes, Clive
Comments  
Thank you for clearing that up.

I should have noticed there is "simply" in "Korea's government simply has whetted that appetite".
The context before the paragraph which touts a more insatiable demand of South Korea for fast Internet connections seemed to have befuddled me.