"Non-fat" milk, ice cream, yogurt etc.
Anyone else have a problem with this?
I always thought it was purely American, but it has now invaded England. I blame Starbucks, who already have a lot to answer for, being largely responsible for "skim milk".
"Non-fat" seems wrong to me, but I can't quite put my finger on why. I have no issue with high-fat, medium-fat or low-fat, or with full-fat - but "non-fat" doesn't seem to belong in this group. I would have said zero-fat or no-fat, if we were starting from scratch.
I think the problem is that it sounds as though you are saying that the milk isn't fat, as in "Right then, let's have all the fatties on this side, and all the non-fatties on that side". This is obviously different from saying that there is no fat in it.
Non-fatty milk would scan OK, but doesn't really have the same meaning.

Is this just me?
Mickey.
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"Non-fat" milk, ice cream, yogurt etc. Anyone else have a problem with this? I always thought it was purely American, ... saying that there is no fat in it. Non-fatty milk would scan OK, but doesn't really have the same meaning.

I don't know when the "skim/skimmed"
milk variation started, but it's much older
than Starbucks:
"Anne had to live through more than two
weeks, as it happened. Almost a month
having elapsed since the liniment cake
episode, it was high time for her to get
into fresh trouble of some sort, little
mistakes, such as absentmindedly
emptying a pan of skim milk into a basket
of yarn balls in the pantry instead of into
the pigs' bucket, and walking clean over
the edge of the log bridge into the brook
while wrapped in imaginative reverie, not
really being worth counting.
Anne of Green Gables
Lucy Maud Montgomery (1874 - 1942)

Michael West
Melbourne, Australia
"Non-fat" milk, ice cream, yogurt etc. Anyone else have a problem with this? I always thought it was purely American, but it has now invaded England. I blame Starbucks, who already have a lot to answer for, being largely responsible for "skim milk".

What does this mean, that Starbucks is responsible for "skim milk"? That term was the standard term for milk from which fat had been removed here in the US. Is some other term used in the UK? It is only relatively recently that "skim milk" has been replaced, on milk labels, by the term "nonfat milk." It will no doubt take a while for before the term disappears altogether.
"Non-fat" seems wrong to me, but I can't quite put my finger on why. Ihave no issue with high-fat, medium-fat ... fat in it. Non-fatty milk would scan OK, but doesn't really have the same meaning. Is this just me? Mickey.

The word "non-fat" (with a hyphen) has been in British English long enough for it to have been made an entry in the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary ( / ).

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
What does this mean, that Starbucks is responsible for "skim milk"? That term was the standard term for milk from ... milk labels, by the term "nonfat milk." It will no doubt take a while for before the term disappears altogether.

In the UK we usually say "skimmed milk", remembering that 'skim' is a verb and not an adjective.

Alec McKenzie
"Non-fat" milk, ice cream, yogurt etc. Anyone else have a ... lot to answer for, being largely responsible for "skim milk".

What does this mean, that Starbucks is responsible for "skim milk"? That term was the standard term for milk from which fat had been removed here in the US. Is some other term used in the UK?

COD9 has:
skim milk n. (also skimmed milk)
milk from which the cream has been skimmed.

Michael West
Melbourne, Australia
What does this mean, that Starbucks is responsible for "skim ... the US. Is some other term used in the UK?

COD9 has: skim milk n. (also skimmed milk) milk from which the cream has been skimmed.

The thing to note there, by the way, is that
it is not the milk that has been skimmed.

Michael West
Melbourne, Australia
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What does this mean, that Starbucks is responsible for "skim ... doubt take a while for before the term disappears altogether.

In the UK we usually say "skimmed milk", remembering that 'skim' is a verb and not an adjective.

According to MWCD11, "skim" has been an adjective since 1794.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
blame Starbucks, who already have a lot to answer for, being largely responsible for "skim milk".

What does this mean, that Starbucks is responsible for "skim milk"? That term was the standard term for milk from ... milk labels, by the term "nonfat milk." It will no doubt take a while for before the term disappears altogether.

Then perhaps "skimmed milk" is saved! (At least if we can keep out "non-fat".) Whether they still remove the cream by skimming it off the top, I don't know, but I like the imagery. This was really an aside, though, to my query about "non-fat". That term may well be in the CALD, but you don't see or hear it over here (NW England) - otherwise I would have become desensitized to it by now.
COD9 has: skim milk n. (also skimmed milk) milk from which the cream has been skimmed.

The thing to note there, by the way, is that it is not the milk that has been skimmed.

If you mean that it's the cream which has been skimmed, I'd disagree with you.
The milk was skimmed, and the cream was skimmed off.

The usual term in the UK is "skimmed milk".
Matti
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