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Usually a trailing '-e' is silent like in 'house'. However, there are some exceptions like 'recipe', 'catastrophe' or 'apostrophe'.

Are there any more exceptions that are NOT of greek origin (like the both latter examples are)?

Thanks,
Kajjo

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Kajjotrailing '-e' ... NOT of Greek origin

he, me, be, she, we, ye, sometimes the.

acme
acne
ante
Boise
maybe
posse
adobe
apache
karate
peyote
reveille
sesame
shoshone
syncope
vigilante

CJ

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Comments  
Welcome to EnglishForward, Kajjo! I don't know the answer to your question -- all I can think of is "calliope," which is also Greek -- but I think it's an interesting question. I'm sure someone will come up with an answer for you.
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How about 1. suffix 'ee' (originated from the French past participle form)? interviewee, escapee...? 2. Latin words used in English passages? eg. principe (prin,k[schwa],pe)
Hi Randy_Tam,
sure, I am aware of -ee as suffix with standard i: pronunciation (and not only as suffix, but also as part of syllables/words such as in "bee"). What I am looking for are single -e that are pronounced as rhyme to -ee or most ending -y.
"principe" supposedly does not rhyme with recipe, does it? However, even if not, it is interesting to note that there are more sorts of non-silent -e's!

Let' see, whether there are more words like recipe in English...

Cheers,
Kajjo

PS
Thanks, khoff, for the warm welcome here!
Or some French origin words like "cliche" that can be written without that small sign above the character in British English (which unfortunately I do not remember its name!), or mole in chicken mole that is also French, I think.
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Kajjo

'"principe" supposedly does not rhyme with recipe, does it?'

sure it doesn't. the 'e' thing sounds like an [e] or probably [ei], but never an
'small sign above the character in British English (which unfortunately I do not remember its name!), '

do you mean accenté e? though strictly speaking that little stroke is necessary, it is now omissible (without distorting the meaning whatever).
Yes, I meant accent, but I think it had a specific name in phonology. I have to check my books!
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Randy_Tam
sure it doesn't. the 'e' thing sounds like an [e] or probably [ei], but never an

Hi Randy,

Your [-e] turned out to be an envelope, unfortunately. (We use [] for emoticons in this forum.)

Perhaps try (e). Hope it helps! Emotion: smile
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