+0
I’d like your help in this grammar muddle. Which is correct? Are both structures correct?

1)
She not only wrote the text but also selected the illustrations.
OR
2) She didn't only write the text but also selected the illustrations
I got myself tangled up with this grammar issue. I’d really appreciate it if you could help me with this question.

Regards from Lima - Peru.
1 2 3 4 5
Comments  (Page 3) 
AnonymousMr. Torres-Rivero: As the other ladies and gentlemen have suggested, No. 1 is the usual construction. Nevertheless, your No. 2 may be almost correct, too. I found this example in Professor Quirk's A COMPREHENSIVE GRAMMAR OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE: Not only did they steal his books, but they also tore up his manuscripts. The professor explains that putting "not only" first is more dramatic. Therefore, I assume that the "natural" order would be correct, too: They did not only steal his books, but they also tore up his manuscripts. With that in mind, surely the following is "good" English: She did not only write the text, but she also selected the illustrations.


I disagree with your assumption about the natural order.

It's not "They did not only steal his books" but "They not only stole his books."

The "did steal" is necessary because of the inversion - in the natural order, you use the simple past.

Therefore, "She did not only write the text" is not natural either. "She not only wrote the text."

Please refer to Clive's excellent post above.
Mr. Torres-Rivero: May I leave you with three suggestions: (l) Do take the advice of these knowledgeable contributors: She not only WROTE but also SELECTED the illustrations. (2) If you hear or read : She didn't only write, but she also selected the illustrations, please be assured that many speakers do NOT consider it a huge blunder, especially with the contraction. You can google for examples. (3) Writing teachers say that when you are in doubt -- rephrase: She did not JUST write the text, (but)she ALSO selected the illustrations. Your students are fortunate to have such a conscientious teacher.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I know it's a bit late to answer this question, but I thought I would anyway.

You use a comma before a conjunction only if it connects two independant clauses. Each part of the sentence must have a subject and a verb. In this case the second clause does not have a subject, so you would not use a comma.

She not only wrote the text but also selected the illustrations.

or

She not only wrote the text, but she also selected the illustrations.
That's right.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Hi Anoyimous, not to late to answer, I hope!! You're right. Quirk refers to the dramatic use of negative adverbials ( not only ... never, hardly, seldom, no sooner ...) with inversion. We must use this type of constructions for this purpose only.

e.g.

Not only did he came late, but he also left the office at midday
Not only did she write a good exercise , but she also nice illustrations

She wrote not only a good exercise ..... the function of 'not only' is not the same here as it is in:
Not only did she write a good exercise , but she also nice illustrations

Following sentences are not correct:

*She not only wrote...
* She didn't only...

No sooner had I arrived, I realized I had left my keys inside.
Never will I forget what you told me.

Tip: Invert and place auxiliar or modal-auxiliar like in the interrogatives:

did she write....?

will I forget...?

The result will be: Not only did she write
Never will I forget
Anonymous No sooner had I arrived, I realized I had left my keys inside.
Why do I hear a missing word after the comma?
You needn't have the comma after "bread."
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
AnonymousYou needn't have the comma after "bread."
I can't find "bread." Emotion: sad
Show more