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Please read the following sentences and find out a wrong sentence.

(a) A: What do you think is the real problem with your major?

(b) B: I don't have any interest in any subject in my major at all.

(c) A: Gosh! Since you can't change your major till next year what will you do?

(d) B: I don't know. I regret I didn't follow your advice to not choose it.

The answer is (d), and they say we should change 'to not choose' to 'not to choose.'

I understand what the question is trying to say, and I got the correct answer.

But when I read a book, I can see 'to not choose' form quite often, so I have been thought that natives are using 'to not choose' form and after some time this rule for 'putting not in front of to' will become useless like the below example sentence.

The easiest way to not live up to your resolution is to make a goal that is simply unattainable. Try not to make goals that are too big for you to swallow.

Am I right, folks?
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No, not still comes before the infinitive to, and will continue to do so for many generations hence. Not after to has a distinct, limited use as in your example:

The easiest way to not live up to your resolution is to make a goal that is simply unattainable. = the easiest way to plan to [not live up....]. In other words, the 'not living up to' is the intention, where 'not to live up to', the normal structure merely indicates a failure to accomplish it.
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Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
But then, Mister Micawber, can we still without causing a problem use 'not to live up to'?

I'm still confusing.

Thanks you.
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Yes, that is the most common way, in spite of what you might have found in a book.
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The easiest way for not living up to resolutions...would it fit ?
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