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Hi,
I just "instinctively" wrote this, and then removed the "not," realizing it didn't make sense. Do you think it's idiomatic on some level?

"Do these things work for you?" (reply) "Not for me they don't!"

I'm sure I've been saying it all my life. Emotion: smile

Thanks.
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AvangiDo you think it's idiomatic on some level?
Yes. Emotion: smile

CJ
AvangiI'm sure I've been saying it all my life.
Me too.
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Hi Avangi,

I've always wanted to have someone explain this kind of saying to me. It's a bit confused to soemone who's not a native. Because you have "Not" at the beginning of a sentence, which ends with "negative' words.

Ex. This is my house. (reply) "Not for another 2 hours it isn't." Does that mean "you could have your house back in 2 hours"?

Thanks

Tinanam
tinanam0102 Does that mean "you could have your house back in 2 hours"?
That's absolutely the way I would take it. Emotion: smile
Hi Avangi,

Thank you very much.

Regards,

Tinanam
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Hi, Avangi

Your sentence made me think of South Park and I remembered hearing this sentence in one of its numerous episodes: "Not anymore you're not"

I looked it up and it seems a very popular phrase

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Not%20Anymore%20You're%20Not

I think this phrase bears a striking resemblance to yours. ))
MrPernickety "Not anymore you're not"
Right. Sometimes the form has a threatening tone.

My original post should have been a statement instead of a question, since that's the way it's most often used:

"These things work perfectly!" (reply) "Not for me they don't." Emotion: angry
That formulation seems to me to be no more anomalous than
-- Does that work for you?
-- No, it doesn't.

Both "no" and "it doesn't" say the same thing. But that wouldn't suggest to us we should "correct" it thus:
-- Does that work for you?
-- Yes, it doesn't.

In the statement "Not for me it doesn't", "not for me" and "it doesn't" say the same thing twice in much the same way, to my ear, as in the example above. Perhaps we should add a comma? "Not for me, it doesn't." We might even consider this: "Not for me, no, it doesn't." Emotion: smile

CJ
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