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Would you help me interpret the following? The sentence is inverted because "not" is placed at the very beggining. This doesn't seem to be a case of the double negative. Or, is it?

Not for nothing is she a former singer.

Not for nothing is the city a sister city of New York.

Hiro

Sendai, Japan
Comments  
Hi Hiro. I think the 'not' at the beginning of the sentence can be interpreted as a form of double negative.

'Not for nothing' sounds like 'there are some reasons behind' in your sentences. Let's see what others think.
Hi, Jay.

Thanks for your thought. Yes, let's just await what other think. A quick Googling found so many similar examples.

Correction: as it is so clear "beggining" should have been "beginning" in my first post. I knocked the query up in no time as I sped out of my office.
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Hi, Jay.

Thanks for your thought. Yes, let's just await what others think. A quick Googling found so many similar examples.

Correction: as it is so clear "beggining" should have been "beginning" in my first post. I knocked the query up in no time as I sped out of my office.

Hiro
Hi all,

To be honest, I've never seen or heard this before.
Hi guys,

Not for nothing is the city a sister city of New York can be rephrased as

The city is not a sister city of New York for nothing. The meaning is that there is, indeed, a reason.

The double negative adds emphasis. For example,if someone asks me to help them with their English, I might say I don't work for nothing! (Not, alas, a principle that I follow on this forum)

The inverted word order adds a rather rhetorical flourish and style to the sentence.

You'll find a few examples of this via google, eg

Not for nothing do many established professional writers consider that it is harder to write a good short story than a novel.

Best wishes, Clive
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This doesn't seem to be a case of the double negative. Or, is it?

It is a double negative, but not a double negative intended to be a single negative. It is therefore correct.
Only a double negative wrongly substituting for a single negative is a problem grammatically.
This one is intended to be a double negative with double negative meaning.

CJ
CliveNot for nothing do many established professional writers consider that it is harder to write a good short story than a novel.

Best wishes, Clive

Hi, there.

I follow every example that you gave me but this. Could you paraphrase it, Clive?

Oh, okay, so the sentences is a positive statement ... okay, thanks, CJ.

Hiro
Hi,


Not for nothing do many established professional writers consider that it is harder to write a good short story than a novel. Could you paraphrase it?

Many established professional writers do not consider for nothing that it is harder to write a good short story than a novel. In other words,

Many established professional writers do not consider for no reason that it is harder to write a good short story than a novel. In other words,

Many established professional writers have a reason to consider that it is harder to write a good short story than a novel. In other words,

Many established professional writers consider that it is harder to write a good short story than a novel.

Clive
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