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Americans are not nearly as divided as our rancorous politics might suggest.

Americans are a lot less divided than our rancorous policics migtht suggest.

The first sentence is form cnn.com.
Is the second sentece is correct and carry about the same meanig?
I especially want to know if the than usage is correct.

Thanks
LiJ
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LiveinjapanAmericans are not nearly as divided as our rancorous politics might suggest.

Americans are a lot less divided than our rancorous policics migtht suggest.

The first sentence is form cnn.com.
Is the second sentece is correct and carry about the same meanig?
I especially want to know if the than usage is correct.

Thanks
LiJ
Hi,

In my opinion, not nearly as divided as means less divided than. The addition of a lot stretches it a bit far. Let's take another example:

The cost of buying my house is $800,000, and yours $900,000. Both are expensive. To me, my house is not nearly as expensive as yours OR my house is less expensive than yours. However, if mine costs $500,000 instead, though still expensive, my house is a lot less expensive than yours.

Comments  
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Your explanation helped me a lot. Thanks, HT. Emotion: smile

There is a point of grammar being overlooked here. In traditional English grammar, a declarative us of "near" calls for the conjunction "as":

as near as I wanted to be


while a negative statement requires "so"

not so near as I wished

This distinction has almost disappeared.

The Grey-Haired Grmamarian--is there any other kind?

anonymousThis distinction has almost disappeared.

I knew that! Try to get anyone to follow that rule these days, and see how far you get.

And my hair isn't gray — well, not all of it — yet. But then I'm not a grmamarian. Emotion: wink

CJ

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