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Need to check my suppositions about the legitimacy of an inverted word order in sentences with two agents sharing one common action:

I was not the only one who forgot about the meeting, everyone did.

I realize the second clause can be inverted: so did everyone, but the question concerns the first part of it.

I believe it is ungrammatical to put it the way below, however strong a stress you may put on the I subject:

Not only did I forget about the meeting, everyone did.

OR even:

Not only did I forget about the meeting, so did everyone.

Confirm or disprove, please.

I would be very much obliged for your response and, perhaps, your thoughts about why it sounds so wrong (if it does, of course).

Thank you very much in advance,

YETY

PS Will the change of the syntax in the first part to I was not the only one TO FORGET about the meeting affect the tense in the everyone did part?

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Not only did I forget about the meeting, (but) I forgot it was our twenty-fifth anniversary. There were many senior moments yesterday.

Fronting a sentence with a negative adverb can trigger an inversion. The subject need not be stressed.

The tense of both clauses is simple past.

If the second clause has a different subject, you can stress the first subject to indicate the contrasting element. These are OK:

Not only did I forget about the meeting, everyone did.

OR even:

Not only did I forget about the meeting, so did everyone.

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Comments  

BTW,

Just as an afterthought:

Not was I the only one to forget ..., so did everyone!

I seem to have done it, right?

YETY

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

And again an after-afterthought (!):

Not did I alone forget about the meeting, so did everyone.

Not was it (only ) I/me (only) who forgot ..., so WAS (?) everyone.

Are those correct? Is it because Not with ONLY ... draws attention to the predicate it rightfully belongs to (in the mid-position when not inverted, I mean)?

Sorry I couldn't do it in one post... Slowpoke YETY!

YETY

 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.

Here are a few comments, in bold.

Need to check my suppositions about the legitimacy of an inverted word order in sentences with two agents sharing one common action:

I was not the only one who forgot about the meeting, everyone did. I see this as a run-on sentence and thus incorrect. You need to replace the comma with a period or a semi-colon.

I realize the second clause can be inverted: so did everyone, but the question concerns the first part of it.

I believe it is ungrammatical to put it the way below, however strong a stress you may put on the I subject:

Not only did I forget about the meeting, everyone did.

OR even:

Not only did I forget about the meeting, so did everyone.

Confirm or disprove, please. I agree that it is ungrammatical.

You included 'but' in your thread's title, yet you haven't used it in any of your examples. I woulld, as follows.You need to say eg Not only did I forget about the meeting, BUT everyone did / BUT (also) everyone else did. Or you could make it 2 sentences, as mentioned above.

eg

Not only did I forget about the meeting. Everyone did.

OR even:

Not only did I forget about the meeting. So did everyone.

I would be very much obliged for your response and, perhaps, your thoughts about why it sounds so wrong (if it does, of course).

Thank you very much in advance,

YETY

PS Will the change of the syntax in the first part to I was not the only one TO FORGET about the meeting affect the tense in the everyone did part? No, because it should be two sentences.

eg I was not the only one TO FORGET about the meeting. Everyone did.

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

Clive,

Thanks a million! You made my day. Emotion: smile

YET,

CliveI agree that it is ungrammatical.

And since A. Stars sees them as perfectly fine sentences (3 min. above:)), should I see these as not very conspicuous errors?

CliveYou included 'but' in your thread's title, yet you haven't used it in any of your examples.

Yes-yes! I saw it myself, but "post-mortem", so to speak. I decided that a third follow-up comment would be one too many. Thanks for the correction. Need to work on run-ons and punctuation.

I appreciate your detailed reply.

Thank you for your efforts and concern,

YETY

Dear A. Stars,

Thank you very much for your reply. I see your point clearly. I obviously underestimated the potential of intonation.

YET,

since Clive considers those as ungrammatical, is it correct to think that I should avoid such sentences in writing while they're perfectly fine in spoken language? Do you think your contrasting answers can be explained because you heard those sentences and Clive read them (you know what I mean)?

Thank you for your feedback and hoping I'm not going too far in interpreting the workings of your minds Emotion: smile,

YETY

Sorry, I jumped to conclusions that were not meant in your post.

YETY

Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.

Sorry, I jumped to conclusions that were not meant in your post.

YETY

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