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What's your opinion on Obama's statement, underlined here?

I know this is not who we are. This is not who we are as Americans. We're not a country where young women I met should have to work the night shift after a full day of college and still not be able to pay the medical bills for her sister who's ill. That's not right. That's not who we are. America's not a country where I should be meeting a man who had to file for bankruptcy after he had a stroke because he faced nearly $200,000 in medical costs that he couldn't afford and his insurance company didn't cover. That's not right. That's not who we are. Not only is it not right, it ain't right. We aren't a country that rewards hard work and perseverance with debt and with worry.

http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0810/04/bb.02.html
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To my mind:

1. Not only is it not right

here expresses "a rational assessment"; while

2. It ain't right.

expresses "a gut feeling".

Thus the rhetoric suggests that there is both a rational and an emotional basis for disapproving of the situation.

MrP
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Anonymous "Now and Then There's A Fool Such As I"
Of course, there's also the fact that if he'd used "me" instead of "I", the lyrics wouldn't rhyme anymore. Emotion: wink
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Comments  
Hi,
AS so many people do, I think he is an extremely effective orator. Mixing registers is just one example of that.

Best wishes, Clive
CliveHi,
AS so many people do, I think he is an extremely effective orator. Mixing registers is just one example of that.

Best wishes, Clive

Yes, that's true. Such uses of "ain't" are worth analysing. Here's one such analysis that I find interesting:

http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=792
More register mixing, this time from the King and not the President-to-be:

"Now and Then There's A Fool Such As I"
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