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Would anyone tell me how to grammatically analyze and interpret this sentence?

The free man, says Spinoza, thinks of nothing less often than of death.

Since negation+comparative=superlative, the sentence means: The free man thinks of death less often than anything else, said Spinoza.

Is this correct?

I'd appreciate any comments.
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That's correct. But negative + comparative = negative comparative, not superlative. The free man thinks of everything else more often than death.

(I hardly ever think of death. Well, just when I'm awake. And I dream about it sometimes.)
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Hi Mister Micawber,

1. I used to study English Grammar in Chinese version. Does negative here mean "nothing", and comparative here mean "less"?

2. Is "nothing less" equal to "everything else"?

Thank you.

Tinanam
1. I used to study English Grammar in Chinese version.
Ack! That sounds very dicey.

Does negative here mean "nothing", and comparative here mean "less"? Is "nothing less" equal to "everything else"?-- Yes, that's how I read them.
Hi Mister Micawber,

This sentence structure is very difficult. I'll have to remember it.

Thank you very much for your help.

Tinanam
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Thank you guys for commenting on my question.

I should've written like this.

StartFragment>
The free man thinks of nothing less often than of death.



Since negation+comparative=superlative, the sentence means: A free man thinks of death least often of all things. (i.e., The free man thinks of death less often than anything else.)




EndFragment>