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My favourite sporting blunder was the factually accurate, but totally useless description of a Snooker match where the commentators remarked ... our friends viewing in black and white, the green ball is the one to the left of the blue." -Jason

Not as daft or useless as it sounds: the blue ball was on its spot so anyone who knew the game would know exactly where the green was!
Or the late David Coleman's utterance 'Juantorena opens his legs and shows his class.'
Great days.
Will.
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From Nobby Piles writing for The Bangkok Post.

It is not only Murray Walker who messes up racing ... unique, except for the one behind which is absolutely identical"

What always puzzled me about Murray Walker was his immense popularity. Granted, his bloody irritating malapropisms ('superlative' for 'superb', 'fortuitous' ... but I can't have been the only one driven to distraction by his inability to ever get his facts straight.

I do so agree. I was delighted when Walker hung up his microphone, because with him a little enthusiasm (and boy, he had it by the bucket) went an awfully long way. However, I think he has been supplanted by the even more irritating James Allen. I am hard put to identify exactly what it is about him that has me reaching for the mute button, but it's probably a combination of mid-level cluelessness, microphone-hogging when the far more interesting, informed and concise Martin Brundle is available, and his transparently manufactured "excitement" as the lights go on and then off to signal the start of the race. Now, if only he'd retire and give Ted Kravitz a go.

Will.
Or the late David Coleman's utterance 'Juantorena opens his legs and shows his class.' Great days.

As I revealed in my doctoral thesis (Colemanballs as Metasignifiers of Societal Driving Forces: A Paradigmatic Approximation), Colemanballs can be divided into three main types:

(1) the unintentional double entendre, as above, and also:

"Brazil they're so good it's like they're running around the pitch playing with themselves." ( John Motson)

(2) the moronically oxymoronic:
"Nearly all the Brazilian supporters are wearing yellow shirts it's a fabulous kaleidoscope of colour." ( Motty again)

"The unexpected is always likely to happen." ( And again)

(3) the cretinously crass:
"If that had gone in, it would have been a goal." ( Coleman)

Ross Howard
Yes, you could wait a lifetime to be able to say 'the batsman's Holding, the bowler's Willey' - but it happenned!

Almost. "The bowler's Holding, the batsman's Willey," according to BBC announcer Henry "Blowers" Blofeld, who was there at the time (1976). He believed Brian Johnston thought of it the day before and saved it for the right moment.

And later, "The commentator's Holding, the third umpire's Willey".

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
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Or the late David Coleman's utterance 'Juantorena opens his legs and shows his class.' Great days.

The late David Coleman? When did he swallow the mike, then?

Matti
Or the late David Coleman's utterance 'Juantorena opens his legs and shows his class.' Great days.

The late David Coleman? When did he swallow the mike, then? Matti

I meant lately retired, not lately expired.
Will.
The late David Coleman? When did he swallow the mike, then? Matti

I meant lately retired, not lately expired.

Brian Moore's gone, though, I just learned
And as for Frank Bough sniff.

Ross Howard
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Do you know the Australian Rules commentator Dennis Cometti? Selected quotations.. Stupot

I think we're dealing with a very different phenomenon here: Cometti shows, rather than ineptitude, genuine wit. Wonderful stuff!
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