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Hi there.

In my writing I go on to enumerate some factors that are popularly considered to be implicated in the occurrence of diseases and then I want to finish the list by adding the next annotation by way of an afterthought.


....(factor A), (factor B), (factor C),.....notwithstanding the latter's being held (/reckoned) as (/ to be) a byproduct of the rest.

How could I improve or correct this somewhat untidy phrasing.

Thanks,

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Caou please show us a more complete sentence? You have so many options listed here that it's hard to see what you really want to say.

Do you really want the dash to be part of your actual sentence? My feeling is that brackets are easier for the reader to understand.

Clive

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Thanks Clive

Take as an example the following wording:

It is vastly agreed upon that a variety of factors come into play in a disease's onset, of which are worthy of mention A, B, C, and D—notwithstanding the latest's being reckoned as / to be a ramification of the rest.

I) Can I get rid of the possesive after notwithstanding? I know that in spoken English these possesive are, as a rule, being omitted, but is it the case with written English too?

II) Which option sounds less clunky: reckoned as or reckond to be?


Thank you once again

Thanks Clive.

Take as an example the following wording:

It is vastly agreed upon that in a disease's onset a variety of factors come into play, of which are worthy of mention A, B, C and D—notwithstanding the latest's being reckoned as/to be a ramification of the rest.

I) Can I get rid of the possessive after notwithstanding? I know that these possessives are as a rule being omitted in spoken English, but is it the case with written English too?

II) Which of the next options sounds less clunky: reckoned as... OR reckoned to be...or neither


Thank you once again.

I suggest this somewhat rewritten vesrion is best.

If you have any questions or comments about it, please let me know.


It is widely agreed that in a disease's onset a variety of factors come into play, of which A, B, C and D are worthy of mention (although the latter is considered by some to be a result of the other three).

Clive

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I agree that it sounds more to the point, but could you please refer to my questions? I want to go through the all the process, and not just to copy and past the final product. Emotion: smile


Thanks a lot

Take as an example the following wording:

It is vastly agreed upon that a variety of factors come into play in a disease's onset, of which are worthy of mention A, B, C, and D—notwithstanding the latest's being reckoned as / to be a ramification of the rest.

widely means a lot of people agree.

vastly is not idiomatic. It maybe sounds a bit like 'the people who agree really agree strongly.

are worthy of mention A, B, C, and D This word order is not wrong,but it sounds a bit odd

I) Can I get rid of the possesive after notwithstanding? I know that in spoken English these possesive are, as a rule, being omitted, but is it the case with written English too? I'd say it depends on the sentence, but in this case you don't need it.

the latter, not the latest


II) Which option sounds less clunky: reckoned as or reckond to be? 'reckoned' is not an academic-sounding word.

ramification is not correct

I already told you that the dash is not great punctuation. Let me go so far as to call it 'lazy punctuation'. Emotion: smile.

Di I miss any questions?


Clive

You have helped me a great deal Emotion: smile
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