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This is quite confusing for me. Here is the sentence,

Her idea that I hire you was a very funny one.

Would you say the clause I underlined is a Noun clause acts as an appositive to "her idea" or a Adjective Noun modifying the idea? I would really appreciate some insights and answer. Thanks a lot.

Raen
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Hi.
Her idea is that I hire you was a very fun one.
As I know it's a defining Relative Clause.
Thanks Fandorin,

Did you mean "is" was omitted in the sentence or you put it in there to demonstrate your point?

The grammar book I'm reading (I know, I know I'll throw it away as soon as I'm done with it) identified it as a Noun clause acted as an appositive to "her idea". Could you expound on your arguement? Thank you.

Raen
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I'm sorry I made a mistake. Of course it's a Nominal Clause. I hurried up.

Her idea that I hire you was a very fun one.
It's kind of Subjunctive. And as I know only Present Tense can be used in Nominal Clause.
Her idea that I hire you is a very fun one.
Thanks Fandorin, "nominal" and "subjunctive" are 2 new terms I haven't learned, and I will look them up.

My first instinct said adjective clause (now you revised it to nominal clause, does it still full under adjective clause?) and decided that the book make an innocent mistake until I encountered other similiar questions with the same result:

My hope that we visit Mount Rushmore is now a family idea.

(A: that we visit Mount Rushmore = appositive) and,

The news that he had escaped frightened the whole town.

(A: that he had escaped = appositive)

It's hard to imagine an obvious mistake is repeated multiples times. So I'm wondering if there's some insight that I overlooked? Does anyone have any thoughts? Thanks.

Here's another one:

Then I learned the truth, that I had been cheated.

A: that I had been cheated = appositive

Raen
Nominal Clause = Noun Clause. Adjective Clause = Relative Clause.
Don't mix up them.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Subjunctive is used when the action is not REAL or PREFFERED. And it's rarely used in contemporary English, in idiomatic expression or in more formal speech.
Relative clause (Subordinate Clause, Adjectival Clause ) is used when you want to give more information about event or person or thing is described in the sentence.
Don't worry. It could freak you out because there are a lot of pecularities in Grammar. Don't hurry up.
FandorinDon't worry. It could freak you out because there are a lot of pecularities in Grammar. Don't hurry up.
I'm freaking out! And I have to worry, there's a unmerciful sword of a test waiting for me to slit my throat at the first chance that I make a wrong move.

Somebody help me!

Raen
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