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We can have an insatiable thirst, desire, curiosity for something, meaning that our thirst, desire or curiosity for something is incapable of being satisfied.

What about an insatiable person, meaning that he/she cannot be satisfied?

How accepting seems to allow a subsequent noun clause, but 'allowing' and 'permitting' seem not too?

The host allows extra patrons inside the venue, permitting/accepting that people of all ages can enter (instead of: permitting people of all ages to enter).

Thanks
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English 1b3We can have an insatiable thirst, desire, curiosity for something, meaning that our thirst, desire or curiosity for something is incapable of being satisfied.Yes.

What about an insatiable person, meaning that he/she cannot be satisfied? Yes.

How accepting seems to allow a subsequent noun clause, but 'allowing' and 'permitting' seem not too? ("How does "accepting" seem to allow etc." OR "How is it that "accepting" seems to allow etc.)

The host allows extra patrons inside the venue, permitting/accepting that people of all ages can enter (instead of: permitting people of all ages to enter).

permitting/accepting that people of all ages can enter

Neither of these verbs works this way.

At least, it's not natural.

". . . . accepting that people . . . ." To me, this means he begrudgingly admits that they have the right to enter.

"Permitting" doesn't seem to work at all with "that."

"Providing that" works.

If you look in the dictionary, you'll probably find that not all verbs allow the same structures. The blighters never tell us why.

Avangi("How does "accepting" seem to allow etc." OR "How is it that "accepting" seems to allow etc.)

Sorry--when I re-write part of a sentence, I sometimes forget to check to see if the whole sentence works before posting.
AvangiAt least, it's not natural
I wonder why. They are verbs with similar meanings to 'allowing,' which can be followed by a noun clause.
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I was about to hedge on "Permitting."

A new law was recently passed permitting that violent crimes against children under 14 may be punished by life imprisonment. (That's not exactly a true statement.)
AvangiI was about to hedge on "Permitting."
I've never heard 'hedge' being used thus. Can you please explain its meaning to me?

And it seems you have put a spanner in the works. Sometimes it can be followed by a noun clause. Sometimes it cannot.
English 1b3 How accepting seems to allow a subsequent noun clause, but 'allowing' and 'permitting' seem not too?
English 1b3. They are verbs with similar meanings to 'allowing,' which can be followed by a noun clause.
(Referring to "accepting" and "permitting")

So you're saying that all three verbs have similar meanings,
and all three can be followed by a noun clause - but not in the sentence you propose. Right?

So I think they all may be followed by a "that" clause when the context is right. This probably indicates that the meanings are similar but not exactly the same.
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Avangi
So you're saying that all three verbs have similar meanings,

and all three can be followed by a noun clause - but not in the sentence you propose. Right?


Right.
AvangiThis probably indicates that the meanings are similar but not exactly the same.
Yea, probably.