+0
Dear Ms

I am writing to acquire some assistance from you. I am a teacher of English in Cambodia. I have some difficulties with telling the difference between noun clauses and relative clauses when I have met some sentences using of apposition to some words in sentences. These sentences are as follows:
1. The news that he won surprised us all. (Noun clause?)
2. The news which we received last month was unbelievable.
3. It is a fact that the earth is round.
4. The fact that the earth is round is weel-known.

I am looking forward to your detail expanation.

Your sincerely,
Sothy Sin
Cambodia
1 2 3
Comments  (Page 2) 
sorry ! Could you explane some problem of confusion between adjactive and noun clause to me,please?
for example:
I do not know the reason why I do that
The children who are on the bus are going to visit the museum.
so "who are on the bus" is the sam with "the children"
but "who are on the bus" is an adjactive clause
rooneymutdThe children who are on the bus are going to visit the museum.
so "who are on the bus" is the same with as "the children"
but "who are on the bus" is an adjactive adjective clause
who substitutes for children. Yes. It's like this:

The children are on the bus. (<They are on the bus.)

The children are going to visit the museum.

The children [<They are on the bus.] are going to visit the museum.

The children [< who are on the bus] are going to visit the museum.

It's adjectival because it tells which children we are talking about. The children we are talking about are the "on-the-bus" children -- not any other children -- only the "on-the-bus" children.

-- Which children are going to visit the museum?
-- The children who are on the bus are going.

CJ
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
but how about these cases:
This is the place where i live
Tom went to Italy where he was born

The cat is chasing the dog which Tom bought yesterday
what kinds of clause? how can you explane them?
rooneymutdbut how about these cases:
This is the place where i live
Tom went to Italy where he was born

The cat is chasing the dog which Tom bought yesterday
These cases can be explained in a similar way. [Note the spelling of explain.]

This is the place (I live <there). [there = in that place]
This is the place (<I live in that place).

Tom went to Italy, (He was born <there.)
Tom went to Italy, (<He was born in that place).
Tom went to Italy, (<He was born in Italy).

The cat is chasing the dog (Tom bought <it yesterday). [it = the dog]

CJ
Mr. Hoa Thai, thank you...
You made me understand the difference, thanks a lot again...
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
#1 is an appositive noun clause, not an adjective clause. An adjective clause would mean that he won the news (as a prize). Here, the new is that he won. It is "that he won" is restating the noun "news".
Hi guys. I would like to clearify some of your questions. I am prefering for the Toefl exam and at this moment I am studying about those clauses.

The difference between noun clause and adjective clause is: if the clause acts as a nown then it is a nown clause. ex: What I had for breakfast gave me heartburn. here there is only one noun which is the noun clause that is acting as a noun of the sentence I mean subject of the sentence.

If there is a noun already and the noun clause is second noun . then it is an adjective clause because it is giving an extra information about the previous noun. ex: I love sentences which extol the virtues of English teachers. the centences is already noun (subject) of the sentence. and the noun clause is giving an extra info about the noun. therefore it is an adjective clause. Emotion: smile

remember sometimes noun clauses can be inside the adjective clauses:

ex: Anyone who says that English teachers are boring will be punished.

here : who says that English teacher are boring - is an adjectie clause. because it is giving about the subject "anyone" more information.

that english teacher are boring - is a noun clause. because it is being an object of the adjective clause. so the noun clause is acting as a object noun.

Emotion: smile if u read ceraffully u will understand what i mean. I just wrote everything very fast and not clearly Emotion: smile sorry for that...
Dear Sir,

We have not contacted for a long time as I have been so busy that I cannot fins any suitable time to get some help from you.

Now, I have another problem with the use of 'what'in both relative clauses and noun clauses. The sentences are as follows:

I don't know what to do.

I don't know what I should do.

Do you want to hear what he has said?

I have to do what I believe is right.

How can you interprete the clauses in the sentences above?

Thank you for your kindness.

Sothy Sin

Cambodia
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
AnonymousHow can you interpret the clauses in the sentences above?
None of them are relative clauses. I would call them all indirect questions, which in your terminology would be 'noun clauses'.

CJ
Show more