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Is there any concise name for words that are nouns ... not always? There are about 100 such words in English.

No, there isn't. But you could call the nouns, anyway, 'initial-stress-derived nouns' and linguists, at least, would understand you mean words like 'address' or 'recall'.

Thank you. I will probably put this information to practical use. Mike Hardy
Is there any concise name for words that are nouns ... not always? There are about 100 such words in English.

No, there isn't. But you could call the nouns, anyway, 'initial-stress-derived nouns' and linguists, at least, would understand you mean words like 'address' or 'recall'.

Is "address" really a good example? The in the sense of "a formal speech" I would be surprised to hear the stress on the initial syllable, and in the sense of a description of a location e.g. a postal address, I find either stress pattern unremarkable. I would only pronounce the verb with the stress on the ultimate syllable, but MW11 lists both pronunciations.
Richard R. Hershberger
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On 10 Jan 2004 10:37:21 -0800, Evan Kirshenbaum
Hmm... what would you call the short prayer that is usually known by this term?

I'd call it "not in my vocabulary".

Not surprising. It's a prayer in the Roman Catholic Mass (and possibly elsewhere).
My on-line AHD has this in the Thesaurus section:

A petition made to an object of worship : prayer, collect, devotion, invocation, orison, rogation.
Excerpted from American Heritage Talking Dictionary Copyright © 1997 The Learning Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
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I'd call it "not in my vocabulary".

Not surprising. It's a prayer in the Roman Catholic Mass (and possibly elsewhere).

Certainly elsewhere: in the Anglican churches three collects are said or sung at Matins and Evensong, the first specific to the day, the other two unchanging. A collect for the day is also said at the Eucharist (usual C of E term for the Mass).
Alan Jones
Here's one:(...mercilessly snipped...) REsearch (noun) reSEARCH (verb)

In BrE, the stress falls, "classically", on the the second syllable in both noun and verb; but the pattern you mention is nonetheless now widespread, including among English literature academics. I myself would never say "REsearch".
Mike.
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Not surprising. It's a prayer in the Roman Catholic Mass (and possibly elsewhere).

Certainly elsewhere: in the Anglican churches three collects are said or sung at Matins and Evensong, the first specific to ... collect for the day is also said at the Eucharist (usual C of E term for the Mass). Alan Jones

It seems possibly worth mentioning that there's a dialectal lay noun* "collect" meaning " place where water collects", and also stated to be a synonym of "sinkhole".
I wonder what dialect that might occur in. It's not in mine.
I would have thought the word "sink" would be more appropriate than "sinkhole" for a place where water collects. Isn't a sinkhole a place where the ground at the surface has collapsed into a subterranean chamber? Is there another name for that?
"Sink" can refer to a place where things collect in a more general sense. An engineer I once worked with found it amusing to identify sources and sinks of paper clips. He found that one desk, a source, would need a continual resupply of paper clips while others, sinks, accumulated them.
Some people were continually clipping things together before sending them through the internal mail system, while other people were removing and saving the paper clips before discarding the received packets or portions thereof.

* Source Merriam-Webster's Unabridged Dictionary also known as Webster's Third New International Dictionary on CD-ROM.
Some dialects add "cement" and "police". (Menken gives "cement" without comment.) I'd add "defense", "reject", and "subject".

'Cement, police, defense' stressed that way definitely are Americanisms, and I'm a little unhappy with the noun use of 'reject', although I've undoubtedly used it with the stress you describe.
My own
dialect uses only the first syllable accent for "accent",

What about 'accented', eg 'accented syllable'?
"august",
I think I may vary on this one.
"convoy",

I've never heard the second syllable stressed.
"consummate", "expert",
'Consummate' is different for me, although I don't use the adjectival form a lot. I've never heard 'expert' stressed on the second syllable - sounds like 'formerly pert'.
"natal";
I can't even think how this can be used except as an adjective. I stress the first syllable too.
and I don't have "collect"
as a noun,Only for prayers - not a word I would ever use.

"descant" as a verb, "ferment" as an adjective, "instinct"
as an adjective,Likewise.

Rob Bannister
My own dialect uses only the first syllable accent for "accent",

What about 'accented', eg 'accented syllable'?

Still first syllable. It moves in "accentuate".
"natal"; I can't even think how this can be used except as an adjective.

I've seen it meaning "relating to the nates", typically in laws prohibiting exposure of the "natal cleft".

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >The misinformation that passes for
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >gospel wisdom about English usagePalo Alto, CA 94304 >is sometimes astounding.

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It seems possibly worth mentioning that there's a dialectal lay noun* "collect" meaning " place where water collects", and also ... a place where the ground at the surface has collapsed into a subterranean chamber? Is there another name for that?

I would say that a sink or sinkhole would be better defined as a place where water disappears (into the subterranean chamber beneath). Even whole rivers can disappear down sinkholes, to continue flowing underground. Is "karst" the other name you were thinking of?

I don't recall seeing "collect" used, but it sounds like it ought to mean something more like a rock hollow which collects rainwater that stays there until it evaporates. If that is the case, then the dictionary's definition might be correct, but equating it to sinkhole looks like an error.
"Sink" can refer to a place where things collect in a more general sense. An engineer I once worked with ... He found that one desk, a source, would need a continual resupply of paper clips while others, sinks, accumulated them.

I'd still be inclined to stay with the idea of a sink being somewhere that things disappear rather than collect. A person in the office who bends and destroys paperclips would be a sink but not a collector. A kitchen sink is a sink because it's where you pour stuff down the drain to get rid of it, not because it collects anything. A heat sink is for getting rid of heat, not retaining it. I suppose it does gather the heat temporarily, but it is with the aim of radiating it away out of the system.
Some people were continually clipping things together before sending them through the internal mail system, while other people were removing ... thereof. * Source Merriam-Webster's Unabridged Dictionary also known as Webster's Third New International Dictionary on CD-ROM.

In Australian vernacular, a collect can mean a winning bet. Is that used anywhere else?

Regards
John
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