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A recent addition to the paradigm is "embed/imbed", which gained a new sense as a noun during the invasion of ... and the noun as ('Im bEd) rather than ('Em bEd) (even though the preferred spelling is "embed" rather than "imbed").

Could be the "pin"/"pen" merger. I'm not sure it is, though, because I don't have the merger and I'd rather say "imbed" than "embed" for the noun as well. Perhaps it has to do with the fact that most of the stress-shifting verb/nouns are based on prefixed Latin verbs, and "in-", not "en-", is the Latin prefix, so the "en-" in "embed" gets the pronunciation of "in-".
-Aaron J. Dinkin
Dr. Whom
I'm no wiser.

Reach behind you and put your hands in your pants. You will encounter two fleshy areas. These are the "nates", ... go on record as saying "Ya can't expose yer butt-crack", satisfy themselves by requiring that the natal cleft be covered.

Yes, but what is the noun "natal" (apart from a South African province, Natal)? I think that is what Rob was trying to ask.

Regards
John
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Lawmakers who don't think they can go on record as saying "Ya can't expose yer butt-crack", satisfy themselves by requiring that the natal cleft be covered.

When you first mentioned it, I thought it referred to the anterior cleft, from which birth takes place.
Wrong etymology of natal, no doubt.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
I see. Well, wikipedia is sort of a dead loss, ... completely wrong. I gave up after seeing how it works.

I sympathize, since even I could see serious problems with some of those articles. I rewrote the one on "grammar" a bit, but it needs professional attention.
Instead of giving up, though, one possibility would be for you to assign each student in your classes (at the appropriate level) an article to correct. Seeing mistakes motivates a lot of people, the exercise would be just as good as many other exercises you could have them do, and the result would be more valuable to others than classroom exercises usually are.
Hear, hear, Prof. John Lawler! I've been shocked to see (a) reputable AUE posters quoting the wikipedia as if it were some sort of reliable source of information (Hi, (REDACTED)!), and (b) reputable AUE posters indicating that they participate in the wikipedia process (Hi, M(EDACTED)!).

"Jerry" with a J. (Yes, I figured out who you meant.) And why is it more disreputable to correct people and get corrected in Wikipedia than here?

Jerry Friedman
I'm no wiser.

Reach behind you and put your hands in your pants. You will encounter two fleshy areas. These are the "nates", ... go on record as saying "Ya can't expose yer butt-crack", satisfy themselves by requiring that the natal cleft be covered.

I suppose I should have looked it up, but one of the things I love about AUE is how I learn new things almost every day.

Rob Bannister
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Yes, but what is the noun "natal" (apart from a South African province, Natal)? I think that is what Rob was trying to ask.

(OED1)
Natal
B. /sb./ † 1. A birthday-feast.

† 2. /pl./ Birthday celebrations. /obs./

This escapes the SOED4=NSOED & SOED5 compass of words active since 1700.

Martin Ambuhl
Reach behind you and put your hands in your pants. ... satisfy themselves by requiring that the natal cleft be covered.

Yes, but what is the noun "natal" (apart from a South African province, Natal)? I think that is what Rob was trying to ask.

The provance is now KwaZulu/Natal, or KZN for short. But the name has nothing to do with buttocks, rather with birth.
To me, "natal" is an adjective relating to birth.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
The provance is now KwaZulu/Natal, or KZN for short. But the name has nothing to do with buttocks, rather with birth. To me, "natal" is an adjective relating to birth.

But, the English word 'natal' rhymes with 'fatal'. Stress on first syllable and an (ej) sound.

Rob Bannister
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
The provance is now KwaZulu/Natal, or KZN for short. But ... birth. To me, "natal" is an adjective relating to birth.

But, the English word 'natal' rhymes with 'fatal'. Stress on first syllable and an (ej) sound.

So it does.
I've just never assocated it with buttocks, though I have heard that there have been some children who believed that babies were born from arseholes.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
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