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1.The definition of a Gerund is the name given to the -ing form of the verb when it serves as a noun. But my question is how about if this verb also can be noun? LIke the word "play" , it can be a verb, but also can be a noun. So when it serves as a noun, do we still need to add -ing after that verb? As in, Playing/Play is pretty fun. Strolling through stores can exhaust the hardiest shopper. As we can see, stroll is a verb, but also can be a noun. so do we still need to add "ing" to "stroll"? Can we say "Stroll through..... "?

2.Jobs paying well are hard to find. I don't understand this sentence structure. Can you analyze it for me? Why there is no word between "Jobs" and "Paying"? Jobs paying well here is a single object as a subject?

THanks for replying.
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1. Yes, you have to add -ing, especially if there is nothing (like an article) to indicate that it's a noun.

A stroll through the woods can be refreshing.
Strolling through the woods can be refreshing.


But not:

*Stroll through the woods can be refreshing.

2. paying well serves as a modifier to jobs. It tells what kind of jobs are being spoken of.

CJ
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1. A word can both serve as a verb and a noun. But it does not mean the gerund form, v+ing is identical to thus can be replaced by the noun. E.g., play as noun means the game, sports, match or TV series etc, while playing means the action of participating in those games, sports or matches. So, Strolling can not be replaced simply by stroll in 'strolling through stores can ...'.

2. The sentence means 'Jobs are hard to find' where the 'Jobs which paying well'. Here 'Jobs' is the subject, ' paying well' is a modifier to it.

Hope someone may give clearer and exact explanations.
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.