Hello, all. There seems to be a trend these days in academia and the media to inflate language by turning nouns into adjectives. A couple of examples:
"The lion consumed its prey item."
"The nation is undergoing a rebirth process."
A few years back the above sentences would have been stated as:

"The lion consumed its prey."
"The nation is undergoing a rebirth."
What is going on here? Sounds like more double-speak to me. Your time and comment is appreciated. Sincerely,
John Wood (Code 5550) e-mail: (Email Removed) Naval Research Laboratory

4555 Overlook Avenue, SWWashington, DC 20375-5337
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Hello, all. There seems to be a trend these days in academia and the media to inflate language by turning ... a rebirth." What is going on here? Sounds like more double-speak to me. Your time and comment is appreciated. Sincerely,

It began with tacking "situation" onto everything, which scholars have dated to a meeting of the Tees and Weir Water Board budget-allocation committee held at the Bald Badger Hotel, Darlington, on 26 June 1971, and was renewed by George Bush the Elder (as "thing") in the late '80s.
The "process" item and "item" process have been an ongoing situation thing for at least ten years now.

Ross Howard
J. B. Wood wrote on 19 Apr 2004:
Hello, all. There seems to be a trend these days in academia and the media to inflate language by turning ... undergoing a rebirth." What is going on here? Sounds like more double-speak to me. Your time and comment is appreciated.[/nq]Fewer writers and speakers pay attention to Strunk and White's dictum to omit unnecessary words, and more and more people are "literate" (pardon the scare quotes, but "literate doesn't mean what it used to anymore; now it means "barely able to competently read and write") in English. Most people get their news from TV, and the people on TV are now charged with making the news a non-stop source of entertainment and ratings boosters, which means they have to fill up air time and choose to do it with verbosity after verbosity after verbosity.

There are so many buzzwords that have to be used to demonstrate that one is keeping up with trends in the language and politics, so introducing the notion of "process" to ensure that the reader or listener knows that the speaker knows that rebirth is a "process" and not just a . . . well . . . process is vital for maintaining popularity and currency.

Ah, you know how it is. Look at JK Rowling. Every book she writes is fatter than the previous one, as if the quantity of words were more important than the quality. But that is how it is in almost every area of everyday life. And most especially in the media and academia, both institutions filled with too many who are too full of themselves.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
For email, ehziuh htiw rehpycrebyc ecalper.
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J. B. Wood wrote on 19 Apr 2004:

Hello, all. There seems to be a trend these days ... more double-speak to me. Your time and comment is appreciated.

Fewer writers and speakers pay attention to Strunk and White's dictum to omit unnecessary words, and more and more people ... And most especially in the media and academia, both institutions filled with too many who are too full of themselves.

And back in the good old days everyone wrote clearly, concisely, and with a humble sense of their own importance.

Mike Nitabach
J. B. Wood wrote on 19 Apr 2004:

Hello, all. There seems to be a trend these days ... more double-speak to me. Your time and comment is appreciated.

Fewer writers and speakers pay attention to Strunk and White's dictum to omit unnecessary words, and more and more people ... And most especially in the media and academia, both institutions filled with too many who are too full of themselves.

You won't mind an old mate and ally saying "I'm glad you had time to write that, Franke"!
Mike.
Michael Nitabach wrote on 19 Apr 2004:
And back in the good old days everyone wrote clearly, concisely, and with a humble sense of their own importance.

Back in the old days, there weren't so many media stars or published writers. I'm talking about the 12th century, of course.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
For email, ehziuh htiw rehpycrebyc ecalper.
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Mike Lyle wrote on 19 Apr 2004:
J. B. Wood wrote on 19 Apr 2004: Fewer writers ... filled with too many who are too full of themselves.

You won't mind an old mate and ally saying "I'm glad you had time to write that, Franke"!

Always happy to oblige, Mike.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
For email, ehziuh htiw rehpycrebyc ecalper.
Hello, all. There seems to be a trend these days in academia and the media to inflate language by turning ... a rebirth." What is going on here? Sounds like more double-speak to me. Your time and comment is appreciated. Sincerely,

Bureacratese.
It's the "never use one word where four will do" syndrome. It's common among bureaucrats with too much time on their hands (and students with too much time before the end of the exam and not enough knowledge to write about).

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
It began with tacking "situation" onto everything, which scholars have dated to a meeting of the Tees and Weir Water ... Hotel, Darlington, on 26 June 1971, and was renewed by George Bush the Elder (as "thing") in the late '80s.

Thanks for elucidating the surrounding circumstances.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
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