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The now-famous Cheshire cat made his debut in Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland in 1865.

I suspect if I could omit now in (or from??) the above context without making a change in meaning. Thanks.
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Yes-- I don't know why it's there in the first place. I suppose context could require it.
Mister MicawberYes-- I don't know why it's there in the first place. I suppose context could require it.

Thanks, Mister, for your consideration and reminder.

The following is a lager context:

The now-famous Cheshire cat made his debut in Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland in 1865. Throughout the story, the cat pops up to carry on silly conversations with Alice, and then he slowly disappears, leaving behind only his mischievous grin!
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The now- still seems superfluous, Angliholic, except to suggest that the cat is unfamiliar to the writer.
Mister MicawberThe now- still seems superfluous, Angliholic, except to suggest that the cat is unfamiliar to the writer.

Thanks, Mister, for your explanation.

But I wonder if it (now-famous) implies that the Cheshire cat is now more famous or popular with modern people than its first debut a century ago.
Of course it does-- now-famous, not 'then'famous but the point is superfluous and irrelevant. How many things are famous at their first debut?
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Thanks, Mister.

I get it now.