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Hi teachers,

a) How was the man now? He was cold now, and very, very tired.

b) How did the man feel now? He felt cold now, and very, very tired.

Both of them are correct, aren't they?

They have the same meaning, don't they?

Is it right this explanation?

We often find “now” + the simple past tense in narratives or stories to mean at a particular time in the story.

The meaning of “now” in narratives or stories is not “at this moment”, it is “at that time” or “then.

Thanks in advance
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Thinking SpainWe often find “now” + the simple past tense in narratives or stories to mean at a particular time in the story.
The meaning of “now” in narratives or stories is not “at this moment”, it is “at that time” or “then.”
Correct.
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NOW
1
a : at the present time or moment b : in the time immediately before the present <thought of them just now> c : in the time immediately to follow : forthwith <come in now>
2
-used with the sense of present time weakened or lost to express command, request, or admonition <now hear this> <now you be sure to write>
3
-used with the sense of present time weakened or lost to introduce an important point or indicate a transition (as of ideas) <now, this may seem reasonable at first>
4
: sometimes <now one and now another>
5
: under the present circumstances
6
: at the time referred to <now the trouble began>
7
: by this time <has been teaching now for twenty years>

From www.m-w.com

CJ
Comments  
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Thank you so much CJ because I have found different explanations for the adverb 'now' and the simple past, and I wasn't so sure about it.
One more CalifJim,

So now + the simple past can mean: 'at that moment', 'then' and 'at the time referred to'.

I have these text:
Coke used to be an army officer but he is is prison now. Every day is exactly the same for him.
It's winter now and Coke and all the other men get up at six, when it's still cold and dark.

Then, is it correct to say this narrative in past?

Coke used to be an army officer but he was in prison now. Every day was exactly the same for him. It was winter now and Coke and all the other men got up at six, when it was cold and dark.

Thanks in advance
Thinking Spain is it correct to say this narrative in past?
Yes, that's fine.

Authors sometimes use the present tense to make the reader feel more as if the story is going on right before their very eyes. This technique is called the historical present. Occasionally people do the same when, in the course of conversation, they tell a story, but it is usually found only in literary works.

CJ

(By the way, this text.)
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CalifJim(By the way, this text.)
Sorry that's a digital error. I meant my finger did it! I have to talk to him; he keeps on doing it all he time.[A]
him=it; he= it (just in case)
Bring