Hello:
Wonder how critical "you" is in
"Now just you go straight back to the country"
for idiomatic usage in this context.
Would
"Now just go straight back to the country"
mean the same thing?

(Brenda Last is continuing her "Economics studies" in London, in the company of John Beaver, and is "delicately" telling her husband to take a walk and return to Hetton, and not see her while in London)

"You aren't really in a rage?"
"Of course I'm not, darling. Now just you go straight back to the country. You'll feel all right tomorrow."
Evelyn Waugh, A Handful of Dust, p. 61

Is she derisively using an idiom used mostly when talking with children?

Thank you.
Marius Hancu
Hello: Wonder how critical "you" is

You can't omit the subject pronoun here - "I wonder..."
in "Now just you go straight back to the country" for idiomatic usage in this context. Would "Now just go straight back to the country" mean the same thing?

Yes. Including the pronoun here is unusual, but not incorrect. It makes imperative a little more like a suggestion than a command, but it doesn't really change the meaning.
(Brenda Last is continuing her "Economics studies" in London, in the company of John Beaver, and is "delicately" telling ... Evelyn Waugh, A Handful of Dust, p. 61 Is she derisively using an idiom used mostly when talking withchildren?

No - it's just a stylistic variation. The sentence is a little less formal with "you", so it might be slightly more common when addressing children, but there's nothing derisive about it.

Mark Barratt
Budapest
in "Now just you go straight back to the country" ... go straight back to the country" mean the same thing?

Yes. Including the pronoun here is unusual, but not incorrect. It makes imperative a little more like a suggestion than a command, but it doesn't really change the meaning.

Thank you.
Marius Hancu
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Yes. Including the pronoun here is unusual, but not incorrect. ... than a command, but it doesn't really change the meaning.

There seem to me to be stylistic implications to the usage, though. The speaker is more likely than not to be a woman, or the person addressed a child, or both. There is something perhaps playfully patronizing, or matronizing, about both the "just" and the use of the pronoun with an imperative. The reformed Scrooge, in that movie we watch once a year, says something like "Now just you go out and buy another coal scuttle, Bob Cratchit!", meaning to be kind but unable to completely drop
his former peremptory ways. CDB
The speaker is more likely than not to be a woman, or the person addressed a child, or both. There is something perhaps playfully patronizing, or matronizing, about both the "just" and the use of the pronoun with an imperative.

That was also my feeling about the passage.
Brenda's definitely patronizing her husband there ... (in addition to cuckholding him).
Thanks.
Marius Hancu
The speaker is more likely than not to be a ... "just" and the use of the pronoun with an imperative.

That was also my feeling about the passage. Brenda's definitely patronizing her husband there ... (in addition to cuckholding him).

That should be "cuckolding", by the way.

Andrew Gwilliam
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