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Nowhere in Britain has bureaucratic centralization proceeded with more pace than in Scotland.

I know the above sentence is correct and I come across many other sentences of this type frequently. But such sentences don't make much sense to me. And if I have written the above sentence in the following way, then that sentence would seem more correct to me:

Nowhere in Britain bureaucratic centralization has proceeded with more pace than in Scotland.
Comments  
Your version is not natural in English. Learn what the natives are saying, don't invent or translate from other languages.
Sentence initial negatives trigger subject-operator inversion.

Nowhere is it more obvious that this is true. [Not Nowhere it is ...]
Never have they treated us so badly. [Not Never they have ...]
Under no circumstances should you use foul language.
[Not Under no circumstances you should ...]

CJ
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Is it correct?

Not nowhere in Britain bureaucratic centralization has proceeded with more pace than in Scotland.
No. English does not use double negatives (which you have in not nowhere).

CJ
CalifJimNo. English does not use double negatives (which you have in not nowhere).
Hi CJ

I was trying to copy your sentence:

Nowhere is it more obvious that this is true. [Not Nowhere it is ...]

Where did I go wrong?
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I hope the difference between normal font and italic font is coming through for you.

When we write

Nowhere is it ........ [Not Nowhere it is ...]

we mean

Use this: Nowhere is it ......
And don't use this: Nowhere it is ....

X [And not Y]

Suppose I were showing you how to spell Jackson. I could show it like this:

Jackson [Not Jiksum]

CJ
Thanks a lot, CJ.

And to you, Marius, I wasn't trying to invent anything. I just put forward my problem and asked for an explanation.

Best wishes, Jackson