I felt very badly about the slur.
I could care less about otiose commas.
I'm waiting on line for tickets.
etc.
What is the explanation? None of it makes sense.
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I. Ozza filted:
I felt very badly about the slur. I could care less about otiose commas. I'm waiting on line for tickets. etc. What is the explanation? None of it makes sense.

You got a problem with that?...r

What good is being an executive if you never get to execute anyone?
I felt very badly about the slur.

That should be "I felt very bad about the slur."
I could care less about otiose commas.

Lots of people say "I could care less" when they mean "I couldn't care less". No, I have no idea why they do it, but they do.
I'm waiting on line for tickets.

Most Americans wait "in line", but New Yorkers tend to say "on line". The British will use "queue" rather than "line", but I'm not sure of the exact expression. Perhaps it's "I'm queued for tickets."
What is the explanation? None of it makes sense.

I agree.
Bill
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I felt very badly about the slur.

That should be "I felt very bad about the slur."

Yep. Replace "badly" with "awfully" and it's clearly that "badly" is wrongly.
I could care less about otiose commas.

Lots of people say "I could care less" when they mean "I couldn't care less". No, I have no idea why they do it, but they do.

We do it because we can and because we like it and because we believe it's rightly.
I'm waiting on line for tickets.

Most Americans wait "in line", but New Yorkers tend to say "on line".

When it comes to a talk-off between New Yorkers and other American speakers, New Yorkers win hands-downly.
The British will use "queue" rather than "line", but I'm not sure of the exact expression. Perhaps it's "I'm queued for tickets."

What is the explanation? None of it makes sense.

I agree.

And if it doesn't make sense, then it must be an idiom, even if it's incorrectly.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
Cynical by nature, by habit, and by choice.
Native speaker of American; posting from Taiwan.
"I've never met a solecism I couldn't turn into an acceptable idiom." (The name of your favorite descriptivist linguist here.)
I felt very badly about the slur.

That should be "I felt very bad about the slur."

Right.
I could care less about otiose commas.

Lots of people say "I could care less" when they mean "I couldn't care less". No, I have no idea why they do it, but they do.

It started in the 50's or early 60's with "I could care less?" spoken as a question, meaning "Could I care less?", with the anticipated answer of "No, I couldn't care less". The intonation of a question seems to have been lost somewhere, so now it is said as an affirmative statement. When it was a question, it was sort of like the phrase, "What, me worry?" They both come from Yiddish speakers or the children of Yiddish speakers. In Yiddish, it's common to use the words of an affirmative sentence and make a question out of the sentence by means of stress and intonation. "You want ME to do that?" "YOU want me to do that?" "You WANT me to do that?" "You want me to do THAT?"
I'm waiting on line for tickets.

Most Americans wait "in line", but New Yorkers tend to say "on line".

I heard on NPR that "on line" was spreading beyond New York. I haven't noticed it, but maybe.
The British will use "queue" rather than "line", but I'm not sure of the exact expression. Perhaps it's "I'm queued for tickets."

What is the explanation? None of it makes sense.

I agree. Bill Reverse parts of the user name and ISP name for my e-address

If you are inclined to email me
for some reason, remove NOPSAM :-)
That should be "I felt very bad about the slur."

It's just a bog-standard verb, sometimes with a (phrasal) particle added: "I'm queuing (up) for tickets."
Brits live longer and more fulfilled lives by using one word in place of three.
DC
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BrE: "I'm queueing for tickets" (sometimes, in the plural, "We're queueing up for tickets"). Or "I'm in the queue for tickets."

I'm not at all sure about the spelling - "ueuei" looks odd, but any variation looks even odder. The MS spellchecker offers "queuing". NSOED allows either.
Alan Jones
That should be "I felt very bad about the slur." ... of the exact expression. Perhaps it's "I'm queued for tickets."

It's just a bog-standard verb, sometimes with a (phrasal) particle added: "I'm queuing (up) for tickets." Brits live longer and more fulfilled lives by using one word in place of three.

Some Brits use the words "waiting on" (other than regarding tables) to mean "waiting for".
You might hear in a canteen "we're waiting on chips", meaning "we are so badly organised that you are going to have to stand here for half your lunch break until we manage to produce a major part of your meal" - another example of that efficient use of words.
It's just a bog-standard verb, sometimes with a (phrasal) particle ... fulfilled lives by using one word in place of three.

Some Brits use the words "waiting on" (other than regarding tables) to mean "waiting for".

Works for the Robert E. Lee.
Jeff

"The power of the Executive to cast a man into prison without formulating any charge known to the law, and particularly to deny him the judgment of his peers, is in the highest degree odious and is the foundation of all totalitarian government whether Nazi or Communist."
- Winston Churchill, Nov. 21, 1943
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