Hi,

I have a couple of questions in the sentence below.

(The main character has a lisp issue)

"Oh, come on," my mother would say. "I'm sure she's not that bad. Give her a break. The girl's just trying to do her job."

I was a few minutes early one week and entered the office to find Agent (Just the way he sees his teacher) Samson doing her job on Garth Barclay, a slight, kittenish boy I'd met back in the fourth grade. "You may wait outside in the hallway until it is your turn," she told me.

1) Will you tell me the nuance of this on. I feel there's some kind of pressure that Garth is taking from the teacher. Am I correct?

2) Will you tell me the nuance of this underlined part, in particular, this may. Is it OK to replace it with simply a "can"?

Thank you,

M
Hi,

I have a couple of questions in the sentence below.

(The main character has a lisp issue)

"Oh, come on," my mother would say. "I'm sure she's not that bad. Give her a break. The girl's just trying to do her job."

I was a few minutes early one week and entered the office to find Agent (Just the way he sees his teacher) Samson doing her job on Garth Barclay, a slight, kittenish boy I'd met back in the fourth grade. "You may wait outside in the hallway until it is your turn," she told me.

1) Will you tell me the nuance of this on. I feel there's some kind of pressure that Garth is taking from the teacher. Am I correct?

Do a job on someone means treat someone very badly.

She treated him badly in her usual way.

2) Will you tell me the nuance of this underlined part, in particular, this may. Is it OK to replace it with simply a "can"?

'May' is more formally polite. She is phrasing her order as a very polite suggestion, as a form of being ironic.

British people do that kind of stuff.Emotion: stick out tongue

Clive
great, geat, great. then the rest of the paragraph made better sense. [Emotion: party]

Thank you very much!

M