+0
Hi

Would you say that both of the following sentences are equally correct and natural?

What number shoe do you wear?

Which number shoe do you wear?

Thanks,

Tom
1 2
Comments  
Hi Mr. Tom,
What size shoe do you wear?
Grammar GeekWhat size shoe do you wear?
Hi GG,
what a strange structure. The adjective before the noun... I was wondering if these would also be possible:

What shoe size do you wear?
What size of shoe(s) do you wear?

Thanks.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Hmm.

What size shirt do you need?
What color paint did you choose?

I wonder what others fit that pattern.
As far the 'which' or 'what', 'which' indicates a choice between options while 'what' indicates an open question. You do not expect someone to chose from all the possible shoe sizes; therefore, what size shoe do you wear? However, you might use 'which' when the "askee" Emotion: smile is given a choice between, say, two different sizes.
Grammar GeekWhat size shirt do you need?
What color paint did you choose?

I wonder what others fit that pattern.
Whoa, I didn't know that. I would have said "What size of shirt" or "What shirt size"...
I wonder if such structure is actually a simplification of "What size (of) shoe(s)".

Are the versions with "of" unidiomatic?

Ok ok... I'll just say "What's your shoe size?", which is much simpler, LOL. Emotion: big smile
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
KooyeenAre the versions with "of" unidiomatic?
Yup!

CJ
CalifJim
KooyeenAre the versions with "of" unidiomatic?
Yup!

CJ

Ok, thanks!
But I was too curious, and so I checked on the net... And I'm sorry but I feel I need to take advantage of this thread to demonstrate that learning "correct" English is impossible for a non-native speaker, unless you accept that there might be no "incorrect" English as long as it makes sense.

http://short-stories.org.uk/pv1inanimate.htm

"What size of shoe do you take?"

"A shoe the size of my feet."

Well I didn't expect that sort of answer, of course...

Written by:


Patrick Vickery

Born 1959. Fordingbridge, Hampshire, England.

Resident: Scottish Highlands

Occupation: Part-time Special Needs Teacher, Part-Time Garden Nursery Business, Part-Time Writer. (A lot of part-times, I know!)

Now, not only "size of shoe" makes sense grammatically, but guess what? A writer used it. Now, if learners are supposed to read a lot, how do they know if something sounds odd? Sounds odd to who?
And when you also consider that there are probably more learners than native speakers writing on the net, it gets even more complicated.

What is your shoe size?

What size shoe do you wear?
What size of shoe do you wear?
All of those are used on this page for example, they asked nba players.

http://www.nba.com/magic/news/Ask_a_Player_QA_Archive-102332-66.html

Conclusion: I guess no one can ever be sure what's idiomatic. Sigh.
Hi Kooyeen,

Remember this thread? It carries almost the same discussion--I mean, "of".

http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/HeightWaterFeetSwimWithoutBeing-Afraid/2/vvrnv/Post.htm

Tom
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Show more