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Please tell me if I am missing something. Thanks for your help.

Correct the number usage.

  1. The question was answered by sixty-one percent of the respondents.
    The question was answered by 61 percent of the respondents.

  2. The meeting is scheduled for 10:00 a.m. on February 21st.
    The meeting is scheduled for 10 a.m. on February 21.

  3. These 3 figures appeared on the expense account: $21.95, $30.00, and $35.14.
    These 3 figures appeared on the expense account: $21.95, $30, and $35.14.

  4. Approximately 100 respondents requested a copy of the results.
    Approximately one hundred respondents requested a copy of the results.

  5. We ordered five sixteen-ounce hammers.
    We ordered five 16-ounce hammers.

  6. The MIS manager ordered 150 80-GB hard drives.
    The MIS manager ordered one hundred fifty 80-GB hard drives.

  7. 21 members voted in favor of the motion.
    Twenty-one members voted in favor of the motion.

  8. The cost will be approximately $8,000,000.00.
    The cost will be approximately $8 million.

  9. Mix two quarts of white with 13 quarts of brown.
    Mix 2 quarts of white with 13 quarts of brown.

  10. Examine the diagram on page seven.
    Examine the diagram on page 7.
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Hi,

As a very general comment, I'd say these are matters of style rather than matters of right and wrong, correctness or incorrectness.

Again very, very generally, spelling the number out in letters increases the level of formality.

Best wishes, Clive
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As Clive says, it's a matter of style. Here is what my company's style guide would say:

  1. The question was answered by sixty-one percent of the respondents.
    The question was answered by 61 percent of the respondents. Yes - number over ten are written as numerals.

  2. The meeting is scheduled for 10:00 a.m. on February 21st.
    The meeting is scheduled for 10 a.m. on February 21. Yes, if the hour is :00, you can omit it. BUT if there is another time that requires the minutes, include them in both: The store is open from 10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

  3. These 3 figures appeared on the expense account: $21.95, $30.00, and $35.14.
    These 3 figures appeared on the expense account: $21.95, $30, and $35.14. No, be consistent about including the cents, just like the minutes. If one of the items in the series requries cents, use them in all.

  4. Approximately 100 respondents requested a copy of the results.
    Approximately one hundred respondents requested a copy of the results. No - use numerals for numbers over ten.

  5. We ordered five sixteen-ounce hammers.
    We ordered five 16-ounce hammers. Yes - also this usage adds clarity to the sentence.

  6. The MIS manager ordered 150 80-GB hard drives.
    The MIS manager ordered one hundred fifty 80-GB hard drives. No, see notes above about numbers over ten.

  7. 21 members voted in favor of the motion.
    Twenty-one members voted in favor of the motion. Yes, because an exception to using numerals is when they come at the beginning of a sentence. The one exception to THAT rule is years - but rewriting to avoide a year at the beginning of the sentence is preferable.

  8. The cost will be approximately $8,000,000.00.
    The cost will be approximately $8 million. Yes. It's much cleaner, and also if you are saying "approximately," it's absurd to go down to the cents level.
  9. Mix two quarts of white with 13 quarts of brown.
    Mix 2 quarts of white with 13 quarts of brown. There is mixed guidance here. Previously, we would have said that if one number needs to be numerals, they all should. Recently we adopted the AP Style that said to use whichever is appropriate: two and 13. However, in recipes (even paint, not food), I would say the style is to always use numerals.

  10. Examine the diagram on page seven.
    Examine the diagram on page 7 - Because if the person looks at page 7, he or she will see "7" and not "seven," this is another exception to the rule about numbers over/under ten.


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Comments  
AnonymousThe MIS manager ordered 150 80-GB hard drives.The MIS manager ordered one hundred fifty 80-GB hard drives.
Saying "one hundred fifty" would be correct in North American English (American English and Canadian English).

In the English of the UK, it is not because, it would be one and hundred fifty.
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