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Hi,

As far as I understand, object complement can be a noun, an adjective or a clause.

Examples:

I think it funny. (adjective)
I think that it is funny (that-clause)
I call him Jim (noun)

Because I want to check whether I have understood this syntactically, I have made up some sentences.
Could someone check whether the following examples are correct please?

I think him a Maths teacher => I think that he is a Maths teacher
I know him a Maths teacher => I know that he is a Maths teacher.
I thought him a Maths teacher => I thought that he was a Maths teacher.

Thank you in advance.
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Which ones? The first part before the arrows?
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Hello VC

I think you can leave out (to be) in the case of 'think' but not in 'know'.
(1) I think him to be a teacher -> (o) I think him a teacher.
(2) I know him to be a teacher -> (x) I know him a teacher.

paco
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Comments  
Hi victorycountry,

There are some grammaticals in your examples.

I think it'S funny or I think OF it AS BEING funny

I think OF him AS a math teacher
I know (ABOUT) him AS a math teacher
I thought OF him AS a math teacher

Yes, an object complement can be a noun, an adjective or a clause. It can also be a pronoun or a phrase.
 paco2004's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Hi, I was wondered whether they could be interchangeable.

I thought they might have the same meaning even though they are different syntactically.
One is in object complement whereas the other one is in that-clause.

I think him a Maths teacher (a Maths teacher modifies him as an object complement)
<=> I think that he is a Maths teacher (object as that-clause)

Thanks everybody!
I got it now.