+0
(I) Have you ever stopped to think how often people ask you where you live? (II) Both questions mean the same thing. (III) Some people say "Where do you live?" (IV) And some others say "Where is your home?"

A) I B) II C) III D) IV
1 2
Comments  
How does this kind of question work, Diamond? What should the reader do?
Mister MicawberHow does this kind of question work, Diamond? What should the reader do?

One should find the sentence which digresses.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
B (II) is the one that digresses from other three sentences.
Or, A, because it asks a question and the other three are statements (although the include an embedded question as a direct quotation). These questions, as - I think it was Clive - remarked, require the test taker to get inside the examiner's head. It's hard to know what is meant.
Grammar Geek
Or, A, because it asks a question and the other three are statements (although the include an embedded question as a direct quotation). These questions, as - I think it was Clive - remarked, require the test taker to get inside the examiner's head. It's hard to know what is meant.

but it was a real exam which I took last week and chose B, but later thought that (I) might be better. The official answer is not declared, but I still do think "Both the questions mean the same thing" is not a good starter for a paragraph. But still, I am not sure which one is correct, which is why I started this thread.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Diamondrg(I) Have you ever stopped to think how often people ask you where you live? (II) Both questions mean the same thing. (III) Some people say "Where do you live?" (IV) And some others say "Where is your home?"

A) I B) II C) III D) IV

I assume that the name of the game is to put the sentences together in a meaningful/logical order. In which case, I suggest it should be I, III, IV, and II.

If the test question is "Which one is out of order?" then I agree with those who say (B) is the odd-one-out. The sentence Both questions mean the same thing only makes logical sense if there are actually questions that have previously been mentioned. So, you have to have the sentences that refer to the questions before this.

Siggy
Siggy
Diamondrg
(I) Have you ever stopped to think how often people ask you where you live? (II) Both questions mean the same thing. (III) Some people say "Where do you live?" (IV) And some others say "Where is your home?"

A) I B) II C) III D) IV

I assume that the name of the game is to put the sentences together in a meaningful/logical order. In which case, I suggest it should be I, III, IV, and II.

If the test question is "Which one is out of order?" then I agree with those who say (B) is the odd-one-out. The sentence Both questions mean the same thing only makes logical sense if there are actually questions that have previously been mentioned. So, you have to have the sentences that refer to the questions before this.

Siggy
hi, Siggy. As far as I can understand from yo location, you are a native. The question is "which one is off-the-topic or digresses?" For me, the chance of A's being correct outweighs that of B's or just the other way round. I am not sure. I expect a definitive answer from the natives.
I'm a native. I vote for "It's a lousy question." Who knows what makes it odd? Does it seem out of order? Does it have an element that the other don't? Is it a question when the others are statements?

I completely understood which was the odd one out in the "by the river" question, but not this.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Show more