"To Autumn" is a poem written by English Romantic poet John Keats (31 October 1795 - 23 February 1821). The work was composed on 19 September 1819 and published in a volume of Keats's poetry that included Lamia and The Eve of Saint Agnes in 1820. "To Autumn" is the final work in a group of poems known as Keats's "1819 odes".

Although he had little time throughout 1819 to devote to poetry because of personal problems, he managed to compose "To Autumn" after he was inspired to write the poem following a walk near Winchester one autumnal evening. The work marks the end of his poetic career as he needed to earn money and could no longer devote himself to the lifestyle of a poet. A little over a year following the publication of "To Autumn", Keats died in Rome.

The poem has three stanzas, each of eleven lines, that describe the tastes, sights, and sounds of autumn. Much of the third stanza, however, is dedicated to diction, symbolism, and literary devices with negative connotations, as it describes the end of the day and the end of autumn. "To Autumn" includes an emphasis on images of motion, growth, and maturation.

The work can be interpreted as a discussion of death, an expression of colonialist sentiment, or as a political response to the Peterloo Massacre. "To Autumn" has been regarded by critics as one of the most perfect short poems in the English literature, and it is one of the most anthologized English lyric poems.

lZwSqndKwDw


John Keats quotes

Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness,
Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun;
Conspiring with him how to load and bless
With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run;
To bend with apples the moss'd cottage-trees,
And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core;
To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells
With a sweet kernel; to set budding more,
And still more, later flowers for the bees,
Until they think warm days will never cease,
For Summer has o'er-brimm'd their clammy cells.

2.
Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store?
Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find
Thee sitting careless on a granary floor,
Thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind;
Or on a half-reap'd furrow sound asleep,
Drows'd with the fume of poppies, while thy hook
Spares the next swath and all its twined flowers:
And sometimes like a gleaner thou dost keep
Steady thy laden head across a brook;
Or by a cyder-press, with patient look,
Thou watchest the last oozings hours by hours.

3.
Where are the songs of Spring? Ay, where are they?
Think not of them, thou hast thy music too,—
While barred clouds bloom the soft-dying day,
And touch the stubble-plains with rosy hue;
Then in a wailful choir the small gnats mourn
Among the river sallows, borne aloft
Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies;
And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn;
Hedge-crickets sing; and now with treble soft
The red-breast whistles from a garden-croft;
And gathering swallows twitter in the skies.

You might be interested in:

May his hands wither for cheating me at the last...

Hi My apologies if I have asked this before. Can you please help me with these words and/or blanks here? I tried many times but could not understand what they are saying. @...

Syntax of ‘Zero Down Delivers’

Syntax of ‘Zero Down Delivers’ I have found two sentences that have ‘Zero Down Delivers’. (00:04) Zero down delivers a new 2018 Kia Sportage or Sorento leased today starting...

Vocabulary and accent of Tom Alter

Hi Sorry this may not be the accurate forum for this question, but... Tom Alter (an American) came to India after graduating from the US and spent the rest of his life here working...

I can’t hear the lyrics of a short song in two spots

From 0:15 to 0:17 and from 0:22 to 0:26. Here’s the video with the song:

"gutchering" or whatever it is

Hello everbody, I am watching a documentry on YouTube called History Cold Case - African Man's Skeleton , and at 16:32 the lady says something like "İf we've got some gutchering...