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As most Florentines of his day, Dante studied theology.

I know the above is correct.

Is the following correct too.

As most people of my day, Mr X is studied computer science.

You and I are contemporary colleagues. It should be correct to say people of our days
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As most Florentines of his day, Dante studied theology.

I know the above is correct.

Is the following correct too.

As most people of my day, Mr X [is] studied computer science.

JTT: No required, Andrei.

You and I are contemporary colleagues. It should be correct to say people of our days.

JTT: Depending on where it's to be used, I'd say it's possible overall, but it sounds a bit, I don't know, pompous.

Like most people nowadays, Mr X studied computer science.

Like most people these days, Mr X studied computer science.
JTT, I appreciate your reply.

As most people of my day, Mr X [is] studied computer science.

You found a flaw in the above. I am not convinced by the point you made.

3]As most people of myday, Mr. Coronel studied computer science.

4] As most people of myday, Mr. Coronel is studied computer science.

You said the fourth sentence is fine not the third sentence. No, the third one is correct.

The following is also correct:

5] As most people of myday, Mr. Coronel has studied computer science.
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This discussion is not going too clearly. May I reprise it?

I. Andrei, originally, you wanted to know if these sentences are correct?--

'As most people of my day, Mr. Coronel studied computer science.'
'As most people of our days, Mr. Coronel studied computer science.'

II. Then, JTT confirmed that they are correct but perhaps over-formal, and suggested instead:

'Like most people nowadays, Mr. Coronel studied computer science.'
'Like most people these days, Mr. Coronel studied computer science.'

III. And next, Andrei, you wish confirmation that the following sentence is also correct?--

'As most people of my day, Mr. Coronel has studied computer science'.

IV. Now I can jump in-- if I have understood aright-- and say that

(1) all the sentences above are correct;
(2) I concur with JTT's evaluation of usage;
(3) other tenses could also be used in the main clause-- 'Like most people nowadays, Mr. Coronel will have studied computer science by the time he reaches retirement age';
(4) both 'like' and 'as' are in popular use here; and
(5) another possibility if you need one is 'of our day'.

Have I clarified anything, or just muddied the water?
1. As most people of my day, Mr. Coronel studied computer science.
2. As most people of our days, Mr. Coronel studied computer science.
3. Like most people nowadays, Mr. Coronel studied computer science.
4. Like most people these days, Mr. Coronel studied computer science.
5. As most people of my day, Mr. Coronel has studied computer science.

I am not happy with most of these sentences. My comments are as follows:

1. As most people of my day, Mr. Coronel studied computer science. [wrong]
Should be:
As do most people of my day, Mr. Coronel studied computer science.
(or)
As with most people of my day, Mr. Coronel studied computer science.
(or)
As most people of my day have done, Mr. Coronel studied computer science.
(or)
As have most people of my day, Mr. Coronel studied computer science.

2. As most people of our days, Mr. Coronel studied computer science. [wrong]
This is just simply wrong. It is not correct to say "of our days" in this context.

3. Like most people nowadays, Mr. Coronel studied computer science. [correct]

4. Like most people these days, Mr. Coronel studied computer science. [correct]

5. As most people of my day, Mr. Coronel has studied computer science. [wrong]
Should be:
As have most people of my day, Mr. Coronel has studied computer science.
(or)
As with most people of my day, Mr. Coronel has studied computer science.
When it comes to Dante, it was correct to say ' his day'.

So I want to talk about today; literaly the computer age which we live today.

That is why I thought it will be fine to say 'my day'

I don't know why taiwandave dislike ' As most people of my day' .

To say 'As with most people of day, sound awkward to my ears; I mean in the given context. Obviously, there are other contexts to say 'As with most people of ........'

I just want to know whether the other language experts will chim in with taiwandave.

If you combine Dante and Beatrice together, you should be able to say 'Dante and Beatrice in their day''
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[ I hope you are all know about The Divine Comedy. The Divine Comedy is also important for its place in the history of the development of the Italian language. Dante opposed the assumptions of his day that prescribed Latin as the only appropriate language for serious writing. Dante Alighieri was known as the divino poeta or divine poet.

The following are the parts of The Divine Comedy:
Inferno [ Hell]
Purgatario [ Purgatory ]
Paradiso [ Paradise ]

Virgil was his guide. Dante was a pilgrim. Beatrice was Dante's lover.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
When it comes to Dante, it was correct to say ' his day'.

So I want to talk about today; literaly the computer age which we live today.

That is why I thought it will be fine to say 'my day'



Mr M and TD have done a stellar job in addressing the issues that I thought might be raised because of my reply, and I thank them both for taking the time.

While it might seem logical, Andrei, that one should follow the other, it doesn't always work that way in language. Language carries its own logic and that logic is determined by its users. We see this all the time; something translated directly, that works fine in the mother tongue creates strange language in the second language.

I'll suggest, without having given this a great deal of thought, ['cause you're not paying me muchEmotion: wink ] that we use this particular structure to talk about past events, maybe what we want to show as long past events not recent past events.

So we hear from older folks all the time;

In my day, we did such and such.

But it just doesn't sound right to my ear for my experience in the English language as you have used it. But hey, maybe there are dialects of English where it could/can be used.
We usually use the expression "in/of my day" to refer to the past. It's something older people might say when referring to a much earlier time in their lives.

For example:

Kids these days play computer games all the time. In my day, we played board games like Monopoly.

In the above, "in my day" refers to the speaker's childhood. "These days" refers to the present.

We usually use "his/her day" when talking about someone who is either very old, or (most often) is dead. If the person is old but living, it refers to a time when they were young and vigorous. If they are dead, it refers to the period in history during which they lived. Examples:

As did most Florentines of his day, Dante studied theology.
In my grandfather's day, commercial air travel was in its infancy.

If you are talking about the present, it is much better to use "today", "these days", or "nowadays":

Kids today play computer games all the time.
Kids these days play computer games all the time.
Kids nowadays play computer games all the time.

1. As most people of my day, Mr. Coronel studied computer science. [wrong]
Should be:
As do most people of my day, Mr. Coronel studied computer science.
(or)
As with most people of my day, Mr. Coronel studied computer science.
(or)
As most people of my day have done, Mr. Coronel studied computer science.
(or)
As have most people of my day, Mr. Coronel studied computer science.


Am slightly puzzled by some of the discussion.

TD's revisions of the 'As most people' part are in line with BrE. I don't remember hearing 'As most [noun]' before. (I would say that 'Like most (people)' is common here too.)

Is 'As most people' acceptable in AmE?

MrP
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