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Hi,

1. For Ebenezer Scrooge, the Ghost of Christmas Past is a reminder of memories long forgotten.

2. For Ebenezer Scrooge, the Ghost of Christmas Present is a revealer of unseen realities.

3. For Ebenezer Scrooge, the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is a reprimander of a grim end.

Reprimander: a person who reprimands. (I am aware that this word is rarely used)

Are these sentences grammatically correct?

In the 3rd sentence, should I use "of" or "for" after the word reprimander?

Thanks,

AL
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reprimander is not the right word. You reprimand someone after they have commited some infraction, so it doesn't apply to the future. And you certainly can't have a reprimander of a grim end. That means someone who reprimands (punishes) the grim end. A grim end is not a person, so it cannot be reprimanded. A reprimander for a grim end is someone who reprimands (punishes) someone for the benefit of the grim end. Again, a grim end is not a person, so it cannot benefit from the fact that someone punishes someone else.

Consequently, neither of nor for will work, and you'll need another word. You might consider using reminder of again, as you did for the first sentence.

CJ
Comments  
Your grammar is acceptable, but I believe your themes are not quite right, based on what I remember of the story from movies - I didn't read the book.

The GOCPa brings up painful memories for Scrooge, which makes him vulnerable to the messages of the next ghosts, like the GOCPr: he then sees the present more sympathetically. The GOCYTC is the clincher. Everyone has a fear of death, and after the other ghosts, he comes completely unglued from the GOCYTC's presentation, which enables a change in his attitudes.
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.