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"The entries in Practical English Usage are not only informed by Swan's authoritative knowledge of English grammar, but by a sure sense of which aspects of the grammar are likely to be problematic, and how these can be most effectively explained."


I don't get it clearly, please parse it.

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"The entries in Practical English Usage are not only informed by Swan's authoritative knowledge of English grammar, but by a sure understanding about which aspects of the grammar are likely to be problematic, and how these can be most effectively explained."

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anonymous"The entries in Practical English Usage are not only informed by Swan's authoritative knowledge of English grammar, but by a sure sense of which aspects of the grammar are likely to be problematic, and how these can be most effectively explained."

Which modifies aspects. It has nothing to do with a sure sense of. Another example of which used in this way:

Which book(s) do you like the best?

CB

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The entries in Practical English Usage are not only informed by Swan's authoritative knowledge of English grammar, but by a sure sense [of which aspects of the grammar are likely to be problematic], and how these can be most effectively explained.

"Of which" is not a constituent here. The underlined expression is a subordinate interrogative clause (embedded question) serving as complement to the preposition "of". The whole of PP (bracketed) then serves as complement of "sense".

Within the interrogative clause the interrogative determinative which serves as determiner in the noun phrase which aspects of the grammar.

The meaning can be glossed as "a sure sense of the answer to the question 'Which aspects of the grammar are likely to be problematic?'"

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