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Raising awareness of this problem led to the creation of a education program for children called Turtle Camp of which I volunteered for two summers.

Is this correct to us the of which in the above sentence?
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AnonymousRaising awareness of this problem led to the creation of a education program for children called Turtle Camp of which I volunteered for two summers.
It doesn't work for me.

In this case, "of which" means "part of which."

They formed a special organization, of which I was a member.

We raised a million dollars, most of which we donated to charity.
We raised a million dollars, of which 90% was donated to charity.

. . . . a program called Turtle Camp, to which I volunteered my services for two summers.
Comments  
The first Anonymous user, I don't agree with your suggestion "to which I volunteered my services".

As far as I know, this is the correct usage of the verb volunteer:

a) volunteer something TO something/somebody ...... (volunteer + noun phrase + to + noun phrase)
b) volunteer TO do something ............................ (volunteer + to + verb)
c) volunteer FOR something .............................. (volunteer + for + noun phrase)

Examples:

a) We volunteered our services to American military bases abroad.

b) We volunteered to provide IT help.

c) In the end, we all volunteered for the Army.

Instead of your rephrasing his sentence, you should have just used the construction c), in effect correcting only his badly chosen preposition. Like this:

Raising awareness of this problem led to the creation of an education program for children called Turtle Camp, for which I volunteered for two summers.

P. S. The comma is necessary, because the first clause is independent of the second clause. Also, it's "an education"; not "a education".