So i was reading an article and i can across this : Only 16 made the cut, one of whom was Malaysian model Felixia Yeap.

altough it's the object of preposition, the pronoun 'whom' in this sentence is supposed to be functioning as a subject right? If i'm right, one of whom(...), is a noun clause, so, the object of preposition is the whole noun clause, not who(m).

The right sentence should be: one of who was(..)?

altough many seems to disagree with me: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080405105551AA954w0
kmlkzOnly 16 made the cut, one of whom was Malaysian model Felixia Yeap.
"Whom" is correct. The subject of the clause is "one."

There were six bottles in the box, one of which was broken.

In the clause, the prepositional phrase "of which" modifies the subject "one."

It has nothing to do with the predicate, "was broken."

You may be thinking of something like:

The committee will serve under whoever is elected as president.

In this case, the whole clause is object of the preposition, and "whoever" is subject of the clause.
kmlkzthe pronoun 'whom' in this sentence is supposed to be functioning as a subject right?
No. one is the subject of that clause. Given the choice between who and whom, if it stands after a preposition, it's always whom. End of story. Emotion: smile

CJ
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CalifJim Given the choice between who and whom, if it stands after a preposition, it's always whom. End of story.
No epilogue?
Why does this bother me?

There was room for no one except who had been invited.

Is "except" an adverb here? Or a conjunction?

- Regards, - A.
AvangiThere was room for no one except who had been invited.
Isn't this ungrammatical? Shouldn't that be except those who?

AvangiIs "except" an adverb here? Or a conjunction?
No idea, but it feels prepositional to me. When it comes to parts of speech, no matter what you say, someone else has a different view. Emotion: smile

CJ
CalifJimIsn't this ungrammatical? Shouldn't that be except those who?
I didn't think it was.
Of course it would be unquestionably correct with the addition of "those."

I always thought "He is who is to come" was strange. But I don't think it's ungrammatical.

You seem to be saying categorically that a "who" clause cannot be object of a preposition.

I'm struggling a bit to articulate the grammatical difference between "who" and "whoever."

Surely, "Give it to whoever opens the door" is correct.

- A.
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AvangiYou seem to be saying categorically that a "who" clause cannot be object of a preposition.
Yes, I believe I am. I think we gave up the use of who as a fused relative (i.e., in the meaning of whoever) not long after the writing of the King James Bible. Emotion: smile

CJ
Pity.Emotion: indifferent
Agreed.
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