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I usually come across sentences using the pattern 'off of', like in "The first song off of Metallica's self-titled album got a lot of radio play yesterday".

Why the use of 'OFF' there? What's the meaning of it?

Thanks.
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Generally (and I emphasize "generally," because as soon as I say this, there will be people who come up with examples of when it's correct) "off of" will show up in informal speech and equally informal writing.

Don't put a lot of time into analyzing it - very, very often, people don't put a lot of thought into writing it.
off of is the equivalent of from here. It is less formal than from.

The first song from Metallica's self-titled album ...

Recall that on and off indicate arrival at a surface and departure from a surface, respectively.
Here the off is a metaphoric reference to motion from the surface of the album, as if one were physically lifting the first song off the surface of the CD on which it is recorded.

CJ
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Hi guys,

Google gives 80,600,000 hits for 'off of'. They're all wrong. The phrase is substandard, a bad thing to use in your job interview, and undoubtedly invented by the devil.

Best wishes, Clive
Golly, Clive. How do you really feel? Emotion: wink
Could it also be correct to put it this way: The song OFF the self-titled album ? (without off of).
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Hi,

Could it also be correct to put it this way: The song OFF the self-titled album ? (without off of).

Yes, definitely. Much, much better.

Best wishes, Clive
CliveHi,

Could it also be correct to put it this way: The song OFF the self-titled album ? (without off of).

Yes, definitely. Much, much better.

Best wishes, Clive

Ok. And if I said 'The song of the self-titled album' ? Would I be changing the sense of it?
That's not really idiomatic. Say "from" or "off."
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