I'm in the States. I've already graduated from college here. But recently I went for some English class at a community college since English isn't my first language and it needs some improvement. But I'm not put great efforts into it to keep my grades up since I'm done with my four years. My concern is if I ever plan to go for graduate study, would the grade matter then? Do graduate schools ask for all transcripts from all colleges that a student've attended?
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I'm in the States. I've already graduated from college here. But recently I went for some English class at a ... study, would the grade matter then? Do graduate schools ask for all transcripts from all colleges that a student've attended?

Yes to the last question, at least if the course in question was one for which academic credit in the conventional AmE sense was awarded. (This would be so, probably, for any community college course for which a grade was received.) Whether the grade would matter if you properly submitted the transcript is a whole nother question, of course.
} I'm in the States. I've already graduated from college } here. But recently I went for some English class at a } community college since English isn't my first language and } it needs some improvement. But I'm not put great efforts } into it to keep my grades up since I'm done with my four } years. My concern is if I ever plan to go for graduate } study, would the grade matter then? Do graduate schools ask } for all transcripts from all colleges that a student've } attended?
You bet. Watch you don't discover until too late that failure to do so is cause for denying a degree.
And Oyaroonie! Do put great efforts.

R. J. Valentine
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
The inimitable sys (Email Removed) stated one day
I'm in the States. I've already graduated from college here. But recently I went for some English class at a ... study, would the grade matter then? Do graduate schools ask for all transcripts from all colleges that a student've attended?

If you went to a community college after graduating from a 4-year BA program, you don't have to worry about your grades in the community college classes. I am assuming that because you already have a BA, you are not signed up for a degree program in that community college, though. Just don't mention it. It isn't necessary.

I always put my undergraduate and graduate classes on my résumés and applications for graduate study simply because I needed to show that I had a substantial background in English and American literature and good grades in all my English courses even though I didn't get a BA in English (International Relations) or an MA in English. Those undergraduate and graduate courses earned me a few points at the U of Iowa when I was a graduate student there, but if I had not done well, I would not have mentioned them.
I left English graduate school only because I had to leave Georgia after my tour of duty with the US Navy was over. All right, I didn't have* to, but I sure as hell *wanted to, because I just couldn't take the old south anymore. Anyway, I had to start graduate school at Columbia U the following fall.
On 1 Oct 2003 07:03:21 GMT, CyberCypher
I'm in the States. I've already graduated from college here. ... for all transcripts from all colleges that a student've attended?

If you went to a community college after graduating from a 4-year BA program, you don't have to worry about ... just couldn't take the old south anymore. Anyway, I had to start graduate school at Columbia U the following fall.

Normally we would think a person went through 4-year college would know about English. In my case it isn't so. My grammar and writing are poor. I'm taking a vocabulary class right now. For next semester I'm thinking to take advanced English grammar, which is kind of a remedial course that colleges offer before students take English Composition 101. So you may see it odd for me, but I do need it to get a good grasp on grammar. After that I even plan to retake English Composition 101 to improve my writing. I got a 'C' in my old school days. Do you see anything wrong in what I plan to do?
The inimitable sys (Email Removed) stated one day
Normally we would think a person went through 4-year college would know about English. In my case it isn't so. My grammar and writing are poor.

I would have to disagree that your writing is "poor". It is probably likely that you need to work on organizing your thoughts into something coherent. That is a major problem for many American students. It was a serious problem for me when I was an undergraduate. I think I got a D in my first semester of freshman composition. I didn't learn how to write clearly until I graduated from college. After that, though, I spent many years in graduate school practicing my writing by writing papers for all kinds of courses. I also used to write 2500-3000-word lectures for every one of the classes I used to teach at The University of Iowa, and that meant three essays a week.
Anyway, what you've written here is very clear and to the point. No serious problems that I can see.
I'm taking a vocabulary class right now. For next semester I'm thinking to take advanced English grammar, which is kind ... I got a 'C' in my old school days. Do you see anything wrong in what I plan to do?

Nothing at all wrong. I respect and admire your commitment to what you see as a vital part of your education. I agree. Knowing how to understand and use one's own native language at the highest level one is capable of is a vital part of everyone's education. Too bad so few take it as seriously as you do.
If taking these essentially remedial English classes and getting good grades in them will help you in whatever you plan to do in the future, then do your best in them. Because they will not result in a degree, though, and because they are at an academic level lower than your current diploma, they will not help you if you decide that you want to go to graduate school. However, if you do well in these classes, you can use the transcripts to demonstrate to your current or future employers that you are seriously interested in improving yourself and your communication skills. That is highly prized in American business simply because so few others are.

Taking these courses and doing well in them will also make you feel good and feel better about yourself. I see nothing at all wrong with that. I try to learn new things every day, including things about English, and the more I learn, the better I feel. One of the reasons I enjoy this group so much is that I do learn a lot about English here. I learn from what other posters have to say and I learn from the research of the grammar and usage books that I often do before I post.
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Normally we would think a person went through 4-year college would know about English. In my case it isn't so. ... I got a 'C' in my old school days. Do you see anything wrong in what I plan to do?

My dear old thing, if I may be so forward, your English seems, on the basis of this, quite good. I would correct only one sentence in the above ("So you may see it odd for me ...") the sense of which escapes me, but otherwise more or less fine.
Edward
I'm in the States. I've already graduated from college here. But recently I went for some English class at a ... study, would the grade matter then? Do graduate schools ask for all transcripts from all colleges that a student've attended?

What you do after receiving your degree (graduating) is of no concern to anyone, lest you are going to work toward another degree.

After graduating, years later I attended a community college for two reasons to use up my GI financial allowance for education and to increase my knowledge in the real estate field, with the goal of getting a broker's license. Real estate law was of particular interest to me.
Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
What you do after receiving your degree (graduating) is of no concern to anyone, lest you are going to work toward another degree.

I would have written "unless" where you have "lest". Did you intend some subtlety of meaning that has whizzed over my head?

Fran
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