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Howdy,

Is the following sentence allright?

And if you're saying that best members (at least try) to educate themselves then why the hell those two guys, and especially ThomasW, did not even spend a SECOND to say "no, that's not Jackson's dad" but they found time to offend and insult me?

I'm thinking about the last part of it - is it OK to use "offend" and "insult" next to each other? Isn't it a bit of tautology here? Is there any difference between them whatsoever?

Thanks,

PS. If you find any errors in the sentence, let me know.
Comments  
Hi.
anglista2008Howdy,

Is the following sentence allright?

And if you're saying that best members at least try to educate themselves, then why the hell those two guys, and especially ThomasW, did not even spend a SECOND to say "no, that's not Jackson's dad" but they found time to offend and insult me?

I'm thinking about the last part of it - is it OK to use "offend" and "insult" next to each other? Isn't it a bit of tautology here? Is there any difference between them whatsoever?

Thanks,

PS. If you find any errors in the sentence, let me know.

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define_b.asp?key=55042&dict=CALD

Offend mean "to make angry".

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define_b.asp?key=41231&dict=CALD

"say or do something to someone that is rude or offensive".

The difference sometimes is very slight. Offend can imply that person is being treated in an unfair way and it makes him angry. Insult specifies the offence itself, just a fact of having been offended.
Let's wait for natives to shed more light on it.Emotion: smile
According Longman Dictionary online, there is no difference as far as I understand!...

http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/insult_1

http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/offend

Hope it helps!...

Cheers..
..
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Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Hi,

Here are a couple of comments on how these two words 'feel' to a native speaker.

offend - Often relates to something quite minor. Often unintentional. Can be done by words or by actions.

insult - Usually a lot more serious. Sounds more intentional. Often done by words.

Best wishes, Clive
Thank you, Clive.Emotion: wink
An insult is a clear remark to offend
(i.e. "You are an ass!")

Offense, on the other hand, could be taken from even the most innocent words
(i.e. "Let me help you with that" - "What? You think I can't do it by myself?" is a good example when an innocent offer to assist is taken as offence that the one offering the help thinks the person in question is incompetent)
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I would add that (at least in my mind) "insult" is more objective, while "offend" depends more on the attitude of the person being offended or insulted. If I say "Clive is an contemptible, clumsy, sulky booby, so very far below the average" I have certainly insulted Clive. But if Clive realizes that I am just quoting Charles Dickens and he is amused by the phrase and does not take it personally at all, then I have not offended him.
I suspect that Dickens preferred boobs, as do I.