I keep hearing the term "bangalored" used in reference to offshoring globalization cost cutting in engineering circles. Yet, I can't find any dictionary definition for the word "bangalored" or usage examples.

Yet I hear it used all the time in engineering conversations.

Where does the term "bangalored" come from anyway?

It doesn't sound latin.
sincerely,
Orak Listalavostok
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I keep hearing the term "bangalored" used in reference to offshoring globalization cost cutting in engineering circles. Yet, I can't find any dictionary definition for the word "bangalored" or usage examples.

To Bangalore = Send your job to Bangalore and tell you you're better off for it.
Yet I hear it used all the time in engineering conversations. Where does the term "bangalored" come from anyway?

Bangalore is a city in southern India.
It doesn't sound latin.

No ***.
I keep hearing the term "bangalored" used in reference to offshoring globalization cost cutting in engineering circles. Yet, I can't find any dictionary definition for the word "bangalored" or usage examples.

Probably because it's only been in use for a year or 6 months.
Yet I hear it used all the time in engineering conversations. Where does the term "bangalored" come from anyway?

Bangalor, India. In Karnataka state.
Here's a
I don't know how long engineering jobs have been contracted to people in India, but I think it is less than 3 years. And it takes a while for people to settle on a word.
Here's a Yahoo search result:
Data Network Engineer Jobs in Data Network Engineer Job Search. ... Platform Engineers (Telecom, NMS) / Bangalor /CMM Level 5, PCMM Level 5 , a global leader in TELECOM ... Platform Engineers (Telecom, NMS) / Bangalor /CMM Level 5, PCMM Level 5 , a ... data.network.engineer.jobs.com/ - 47k - Cached
I heard that blood tests from the UK are now sent to India. Since I haven't seen a blood modem for sale, I guess that means they send actual blood via airplanes. Even with the air freight charge, it's cheaper than doing it in the UK.
I have a problem with off-shore. I keep think there are Help Desk operators and computer programmers and engineers working in buildings, on structures like oil drilling and pumping platforms, 20 miles into the Gulf of Mexico or near the Kural Islands.
Maybe that's why the Yahoo item I list above refers to "Platform Engineers".
It doesn't sound latin. sincerely, Orak Listalavostok

s/ meirman If you are emailing me please
say if you are posting the same response.
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I keep hearing the term "bangalored" used in reference to offshoring globalization cost cutting in engineering circles. Yet, I can't ... the time in engineering conversations. Where does the term "bangalored" come from anyway? It doesn't sound latin. sincerely, Orak Listalavostok

Here's the most recent World Wide Words and bangalored is addressed and here's the address:
http://www.worldwidewords.org/turnsofphrase/tp-ban1.htm
Bangalore is cited in particular because of its reputation in the USA as a high-tech city, the Indian equivalent of ... troops for blowing up wire entanglements, which got its name because it was invented in that city.Which was in 1913.

Nell
Orak Listalavostok premed:
I keep hearing the term "bangalored" used in reference to offshoring globalization cost cutting in engineering circles. Yet, I can't ... it used all the time in engineering conversations. Where does the term "bangalored" come from anyway? It doesn't sound latin.

On the other hand, Bangalore sounds very Indian.

Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
Though there is perhaps a reference to the 'bangalore torpedo' which was a tube containing explosives used by the military since WW1 to blow up barbed wire defences. For a cinematic representation of use of same, see Lee Marvin in 'The Big Red One'.
So 'bangalored' might be used to mean 'blown up' or 'destroyed' (referring to the original home-based operation).
If the meaning is confined to 'sent to an Indian city' then 'offshored AND bangalored' contains, I think, a redundancy. Whereas 'sent to a foreign location and utterly destroyed here' seems to fit nicely.
John Dean
Oxford
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Orak Listalavostok premed:

I keep hearing the term "bangalored" used in reference to ... the term "bangalored" come from anyway? It doesn't sound latin.

On the other hand, Bangalore sounds very Indian.

Sort of like Attorneys General - the past tense of Bangalore is bangedgalore.
(The Kama Sutra teaches one how to bangalore)
Jitze
Jitze Couperus filted:
On the other hand, Bangalore sounds very Indian.

Sort of like Attorneys General - the past tense of Bangalore is bangedgalore. (The Kama Sutra teaches one how to bangalore)

We need a proper dictionary definition for the word, at any rate...I suggest "to take a job from someone who has held it for years and give it to someone who speaks in the present progressive and nods in figure eights"..r
I keep hearing the term "bangalored" used in reference to offshoring globalization cost cutting in engineering circles. Yet, I can't ... it used all the time in engineering conversations. Where does the term "bangalored" come from anyway? It doesn't sound latin.

Bangalore in India has in recent years become the location of a large number of computer-related businesses. Computer programmers in Bangalore are paid a fraction of what they are paid in the USA or western Europe. So if you have some routine programming or data-handling task you could get it done much more cheaply in Bangalore. The term has come to be generalised to mean moving computer software work to a location where wages are low but computer skills are high since Bangalore is the prime example of such a place. This is too recent a development for it to have made the dictionaries,
Matthew Huntbach
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