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Can they all be used to mean the same thing? Which of the following adjectives would you use in the sentence below and why?

"I find bodybuilder women and their oily / oiled / oiled-up / oil-dripping muscles disgusting to look at."

Thanks in advance.
Comments  
I'd go with "oiled-up." It makes clear that the oil was put there as part of a process. Sometimes when oily and greasy are used to describe someone, it gives the impression that you mean it's their nature.

"Oiled" also indicates a process, but "oiled-up" indicates the job was done well, or thoroughly. "Dripping" would be excessive. "Oily" might imply "naturally oily."

Best wishes - A.

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Thanks, I understand. However, since this sentence is meant to express disgust, wouldn't it be also appropriate to use an "excessive" adjective like "oil-dripping"?
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I think there is a clear difference between oiled-up and oil-dripping. I agree with MT's explanation.
Sorry Avangi's explanation.
Agreed, but couldn't "oil-dripping" be used here as some kind of hyperbole to express my disgust with more conviction?
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Yes, you can use it as hyperbole, but that's a danger - once you exaggerate for effect, it can reduce the perception that you speak accurately in other ways. While "I've told you that a hundred million times" is clearly an exaggeration, "oil-dripping" can give a sense that you really didn't look closely enough to know what you're really talking about.
Grammar Geekyou can use it as hyperbole, but that's a danger - once you exaggerate for effect, it can reduce the perception that you speak accurately
Great point, GG!