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Old English books or papers from the latter half of the eighteenth century seem to have a different alphabet for 'S', probably Latin, and it seems at the start of the nineteenth century they adopted at once the use of modern alphabet for 'S' instead. Were the alphabets in use got changed at the turn of the nineteenth century? Otherwise these eighteenth century books seem quite readable and the language understandable - not so with the seventeenth century English books!

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I find your post a bit confusing. I wonder whether you mean "letter" rather than "alphabet". You may be referring to this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_s

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My! I am almost sure I heard them say back in the day - 'There are 26 alphabets in the English language.'! Thank you very much, you set my vocabulary right! I did mean a long-s letter by alphabet there. You gave the precise link to the article about 'Long s', and I had observed it fairly rightly too, that at the start of the nineteenth century they adopted at once the use of modern alphabet letter for 'S' instead.. It is said in this article, to sum up,

The long s disappeared from new typefaces rapidly in the mid-1790s, and most printers who could afford to do so had discarded older typefaces by the early years of the 19th century. Pioneer of type design John Bell (1746–1831), who started the British Letter Foundry in 1788, commissioned the William Caslon Company to produce a new modern typeface for him and is often "credited with the demise of the long s."

BulbulTada'There are 26 alphabets in the English language.'!

Hmm ... I find that Wiktionary gives:

(India, Hong Kong, Singapore) An individual letter of an alphabet; an alphabetic character.
(https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/alphabet#Noun )

I think that this meaning is not known or understood outside those places.

GPYHmm ... I find that Wiktionary gives:(India, Hong Kong, Singapore) An individual letter of an alphabet; an alphabetic character.

We learn something new every day around here, don't we?

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GPYI think that this meaning is not known or understood outside those places.

Now I would like to use 'letter' instead. After all what fun there is to be using Indians', Singaporeans' or Hongkongers' English - can always be understood! Would they not themselves want to change back to a more 'official' English? The use of 'alphabet' goes at the 'backside' of my mind - learning new around here! Thanks again.