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Bonjour les abonnés. Hier, nous avons acheté des billets de tombola à un groupe d'écoliers dont le plus âgé avait 8 ans. Ils vendaient cent billets 50 colones costaricains chacun. Le lot est « une surprise dans un carton ». Bien sûr, c'est pour la bonne cause et le lot m'est égal, mais c'est intéressant d'imaginer ce que ça peut être, avec une recette totale de seulement dix dollars. J'espère que l'école atteindra son but.
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Hello subscribers. Yesterday we bought raffle tickets from a group of schoolkids, the oldest of whom was 8. They were selling a hundred tickets for 50 Costa Rican colones each. The prize is "a surprise in a box." Of course, it's a good cause and I don't care about the prize, but it's interesting to imagine what it could be, with a total take of only ten dollars. I hope the school meets its goal.

An American whos is good at French has written the above. This person has written some French/English grammar books too. So I don't question her prowess either in English or French.


My question is on the following sentence of the above:
Yesterday we bought raffle tickets from a group of schoolkids, the oldest of whom was 8.

If it is fine, the following sentences are fine too. I am not sure about the words 'the oldest of whom was 8'.

1. There are many students in my Russian class, the oldest of whom is 36.

2. There are so many people training at the gym, the oldest of whom is 79.
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Comments  
Hello, my try:
If it is fine, the following sentences are fine too. I am not sure about the words 'the oldest of whom was 8'.

1. There are many students in my Russian class, the oldest of whom is 36. Let's change the sentence a bit. Emotion: big smile There are many students in my Russian class, the oldest ofthem is 36. Because the one we are talking about is a human and the pronoun is them, "whom" was chosen. Here, in this sentence, we modify the oldest student in the Russin class who is 36.

2. There are so many people training at the gym, the oldest of whom is 79.
There are so many people training at the gym, the oldest of them is 79. Same comment as above valids for this one too.
Hi Rotter

The sentences are correct.
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Yoong

Do you disagree with Doll?
I didn't say they are incorrect. I just explained to you why there is such a structure starting with "whom". Emotion: smile
Hi Rotter

I don't like your second sentences with the word 'so' in it. I'd remove it if you want to add information about age to the end of the sentence.
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I thank Doll and Yankee for the replies.

Yankee, the reason I inserted the adverb 'so' is to emphasize that there are hundreds or rather thousands people in the gym.
[ It is not a single gym; it is a chain of gyms. Once the manager of the gym told me they have over 20000 people. Big business!]
The Russian class has about 25 idiots including me.

1. There are many students in my Russian class, the oldest of whom is 36.

2. There are so many people training at the gym, the oldest of whom is 79.

Is it fine if I replace the adverb 'so' with the words ' a lot of people' ?
Hi Rotter

Why not just say that then (hundreds of instead of many)?
I wouldn't go so far as to say using 'so' is wrong. It's just that 'so' leads me to expect something very different tacked onto the end of the sentence, e.g. "so many people training at the gym (that it's hard to exercise without bumping into somebody else)".
Aha, yes I understand what Yankee wants to point out. Errm, this is named logical order ( it is a bit different though) in composing paraghraphs if I am not wrong. Emotion: smile What you expect and what you read don't relate with each other.
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