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Sentences that include omissions and inversions are sometimes very difficult to me, needless to say

when they come together as in next sentence. The following is a part of article in Newsweek.

(you can see the whole context here: http://www.newsweek.com/2010/09/20/is-deep-sea-mining-bad-for-the-environment.html )

"Just as the reality of the BP spill has, so fa, fallen short of the marine Armageddon some green groups predicted, so the actual environmental damage from mining the seafloor looks as though it might, too."

I can't fully understand the meaning of the latter part of this sentence starting with "so the ...", the underlined expression in particular.

Would you help me by rephrasing the sentence or undo the omissions and inversions?

best wishes
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Just as the reality of the BP spill has, so far, fallen short of the marine Armageddon some green groups predicted, so the actual environmental damage from mining the seafloor looks as though it might [fall short of...groups predicted], too."
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Kwon Ki PoongJust as the reality of the BP spill has, so fa, fallen short of the marine Armageddon some green groups predicted, so the actual environmental damage from mining the seafloor looks as though it might, too."
The effects of the BP spill were not as bad as certain groups predicted. Likewise, it seems that damage caused by mining the seafloor will also not be as bad as predicted.

to fall short (of A), where A is something bad
~ to be less bad than A

Just as X was not so bad, so it seems Y will not be so bad.
~ X was not so bad. [Likewise / In a similar way], it seems Y will not be so bad.

CJ
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Mister Micawber so the actual environmental damage from mining the seafloor looks as though it might [fall short of...groups predicted], too."
Thank you for your quick answer as always.

However, I'm afraid that I still don't get it.

If it is the case, isn't it redundant?

um...

I mean I thought this sentence is an inversion of the original sentence as the following:

"Just as ... groups predicted ,the actual environmental damage from mining the seafloor looks so

as thought it might."

but then I found it didn't make sense.

oh... I'm in total confusion.

Am I right in saying that this sentence means that just as the spill, the actual damage might fall

short of what some green groups predicted?

If I am right, why as though is there? what is the meaning or function of the expression?

What nuance does it give to the sentence?

Please help me!!!
On re-reading, I found that I was in total confusion, Emotion: smile

But there still remains a question.

Let me rephrase the original sentence in question using easy words.

Just as you have done, so he looks as if he might.

I think the two sentences have identical form. although the latter might not make any sense.

( If I was wrong, plz tell me.)

If just as and so are both conjunctions, isn't it wrong?

or, if so is used to make a inversion sentence, doesn't the sentence need an auxiliary verb?
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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
Actually, what made me confused was whether the sentence was inversed or not.

However, anyway, your advice meant a lot to me.

Lots of thanks.

KP