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Hi

It's a book on philosophy.

It's a book about philosophy.

WHICH IS BETTER AND WHY? WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE?
Comments  
Both are correct. No difference.

CB
Using "on" will produce a more academic, science-like impresion.

Also, consider "book in philosophy"!
(see details here: http://www.englishforums.com/English/InOnOf/zcjbb/Post.htm )
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Hi

Book in philosophy.

Does that mean that all forms "on" "in" and "about" are OK?
«Does that mean that all forms "on" "in" and "about" are OK?»

I think they're OK, though with different meanings or different colourations of them.
"Book in philosophy" sounds odd to me, Ant.
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Yankee:

Yeah, but it seems to be used so widely... Even in titles:

«Man's Way. A First Book in Philosophy by Henry Van Zandt Cobb»

Or, inside an apparently serious book:

«This book, like every other book in philosophy, however much some writers try to pretend otherwise, is a personal statement by its author.»

(BEYOND EXPERIENCE: METAPHYSICAL THEORIES AND PHILOSOPHICAL CONSTRAINTS
Copyright © 2001
Norman Swartz, Professor Emeritus
Department of Philosophy
Simon Fraser University
Burnaby, British Columbia
Canada V5A 1S6).
Hi Ant

I suppose you might use 'in' if the intended meaning is something along the lines of "contained in the series" or "contained in the subject area called philosophy", for example. To me, 'in philosophy' does not mean the same thing as 'about philosophy' or 'on philosophy'.
Yankee: so I suppose the differnce is just the same as between "lecture on/in philosophy"...
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