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What does this sentence mean, given the options 1 and 2?

* There was the news for the country's unspecified spies to sneak into the facility to steal a military secret.

1. There was the news that the country's unspecified spies "sneaked" into the facility to steal a military secret.

2. There was the news that the country's unspecified spies "were going to sneak" into the facility to steal a military secret.

I think without adding more context, the sentence could mean either 1 or 2. What do you think?

(I know it is best to avoid using such a construction of "for someone to do" to prevent it from sounding ambiguous but there's something I'm curious to know, so I'm asking this question)

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fire1I know it is best to avoid using such a construction of "for someone to do" to prevent it from sounding ambiguous

A for ... to ... clause (infinitive clause) does not need to be avoided if it is used properly.

fire1There was the news for the country's unspecified spies to sneak into the facility to steal a military secret.

This doesn't make a lot of sense. Existential 'there' takes an indefinite noun phrase, so I don't know what you're trying to say with "There was the ...".

For 'unspecified' I think you mean 'unknown' or 'secret', but those are nearly redundant because spies always operate secretly anyway.

A for ... to ... clause can't modify "news" as you have done. It would have to be something like Here's some news for you to read. In these cases the infinitive clause is like a relative clause with a modal verb: Here's some news that you [can / should] read.

I think you may be trying to say

According to the news today, spies sneaked into the facility to steal a military secret.

CJ