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Hello everyone,

the most problems I experience when writing texts in English have to do with what article, if any, I should use. I have always been told that it is articles that show the reader whether the text was written by a native or a non-native speaker. I would appreciate your help on the following:

I am compiling a list of companies, where every name is followed by a short description of the services the company provides.
JSC "Marketing Communications"
the/a national communications company, providing services in the area of integrated marketing communications

I am very much inclined to put an indefinite article here. Would that be 100% correct? This company is not the only national communications company, and not everyone would know its name.

(and should it be "communication company" or "communicationS company"?)

Another confusing abstract (from an opinion statement for a university class):
One text was written by S.S., an image strategist, while the author of the other one is a professional musician E.H.
My professor corrected it: while the author of the other one is xax professional musician E.H.

The dress code advocate S. emphasises that employees reflect the image of the enterprise.
Corrected: xThex dress code advocate S.

Could you point me to a relevant rule?

Thanks in advance for all your answers!
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JSC Marketing Communications
a national communications company providing services in integrated marketing communications

I am very much inclined to put an indefinite article here. Would that be 100% correct?-- Yes

One text was written by S.S., an image strategist, while the author of the other is E.H., a professional musician.

S, a/the dress code advocate, emphasises that employees reflect the image of the enterprise.

Could you point me to a relevant rule?-- Use 'the' if there is only one, or only one famous one whom everyone should know, or if the entity has been previously mentioned as having that characteristic. Otherwise, use 'a'.
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Mister MicawberJSC Marketing Communications

a national communications company providing services in integrated marketing communications
Thank you for corrections! So, never use quotation marks in names of companies, right? What about titles of books?
Mister MicawberOne text was written by S.S., an image strategist, while the author of the other is E.H., a professional musician.
This one is quite clear to me - this is a non-restrictive apposition, and I should use the indefinite article, because I am just naming those people and providing some additional information, not very important, not like in "the musician who composed..." My question is rather about using "a/an" or "no article". What about if I write their professions/positions not after, but before the name of the person? So, I guess, my professor was trying to emphasise that in certain cases no article is used before professions. In which cases is it so?

And thanks again for the time you spend answering my questions!
I agree that the correct use of articles makes English more natural. Here are some answers to your questions:

1. JSC Marketing Communications, a national communications company, providing services in the area of integrated marketing communications

· Yes, absolutely, the indefinite article is correct here for the reason you stated—This is not the only national communications company.

· You should refer to the company as a “communications” company. COMMUNICATIONS refers to the business of broadcasting or reporting and the technology that goes with it. COMMUNICATION is a generic term for the process of passing information from one person to another.

· I might also suggest eliminating the word “communications” in the appositive to the company name to avoid repetition. It would read more smoothly as “JSC Marketing Communications, a national company that provides services in the area of integrated marketing communications.”

2. In your other two examples, as written, I could not see a different between the original and the corrected version. Did I misunderstand your question?

Oh, the name of the company was made up. I should have thought of a better word combination, sorry. I asked about it to be 100% certain, because they will probably want to be THE company, not just a company Emotion: big smile
Grammar Glitch2. In your other two examples, as written, I could not see a different between the original and the corrected version. Did I misunderstand your question?



The thing is, my professor removed articles I put in there. In her version it reads:
One text was written by S.S., an image strategist, while the author of the other one is professional musician E.H.
and
Dress code advocate S. emphasises that employees reflect the image of the enterprise.
I can't seem to figure out when it is zero article, and when it's the indefinite one with professions.

Thanks for your help!

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