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The following is a question coming from New Concept English Book3,and its key is b. In fact, I've asked many people about the reason why the answer is b, however, the answer differs from people to people(a,b,c). I'm not familar with the form of on being observed, if you also agree to b, could you give me some other simllar examples?
___________it immediately ran away
a. observing her
b. on being observed
c. having been observed
d. on her being observed

Many many thanks in advance!!!
Comments  
on being observed
=
when
she (saw she) was being observed, at the time of being observed
I am afraid there isn't enough context for me to comment on it. The way the sentence stood, it's unclear. [On] puzzles me and answer C and D mentioned [her] but [it] immediately ran away makes little sense to me...
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As mentioned by those people, a, b, c all work, IMO:

a. Observing Mary, the squirrel immediately ran away. The squirrel sees Mary.
b. On being observed (by Mary), the squirrel immediately ran away.
c. Having been observed (by Mary), the squirrel immediately ran away.
Marius HancuAs mentioned by those people, a, b, c all work, IMO:

a. Observing Mary, the squirrel immediately ran away.
b. On being observed (by Mary), the squirrel immediately ran away.
c. Having been observed (by Mary), the squirrel immediately ran away.

Marius,

Sorry that I see them in different light. They sound stiff to me.

Based on what it’s given here, how did a squirrel get into the picture?

Who is being observed in the original context? And what is [it]?
Goodman
Marius HancuAs mentioned by those people, a, b, c all work, IMO:

a. Observing Mary, the squirrel immediately ran away.
b. On being observed (by Mary), the squirrel immediately ran away.
c. Having been observed (by Mary), the squirrel immediately ran away.

Marius,

Sorry that I see them in different light. They sound stiff to me.

Based on what it’s given here, how did a squirrel get into the picture?

Who is being observed in the original context? And what is [it]?

I tried to make things more specific

it=the squirrel
her=Mary

The observation can be made both ways, but who reacts to it can vary. In this case, it is the squirrel reacting (first).

As to the stiffness, I am using what I am given, if it works, and IMO, all three of them do.
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Marius,

I realized you were trying to make sense of the sentence by creating a scenario. What I tried to point out is that the question in discussion is unclear IMO,and so based on how it’s written, the sentence made little sense without the context you had provided.

You said the observation can be made both ways which is the reason why I said it was unclear. Because the correct answer was supposed to be B which still made no sense, that’s why I believed the sentence was badly formed. I don’t mean to contradict your comments; it’s just how I see it.
Marius HancuAs mentioned by those people, a, b, c all work, IMO:

a. Observing Mary, the squirrel immediately ran away. The squirrel sees Mary.
b. On being observed (by Mary), the squirrel immediately ran away.
c. Having been observed (by Mary), the squirrel immediately ran away.

Hi Marius

I agree with you. Three clause equivalents, grammatically there is nothing exceptional about them.

Cheers
CB
I agree: a, b, and c all work.
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