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My friend today said "On condition that..." and I jumped in and said, "On THE* condition that... isn't it?"

Himself and our friend said "No, it's just 'on condition'. Or both then. They're both fine"

So I'd like to clear things up and actually know for sure - Because I've never heard of 'on condition' - I believe it must be correct - But I was wondering if 'on the condition' was better or not.

I think, personally, the 'the' is dropped as in normal speech. "I'm going pub for a bit.."
...I'm going to the* pub for a bit.

You see? So I'm thinking that actually saying
"You can do this, but on the condition that you..." is the full, correct way. And that "on condition" is the colloquial way? - I'm possibly wrong. Probably* wrong. lol But please help! Thanks!!

Nick x
Comments  
Mother: You may go out with you friends, only if you have finished your homework! (That is the conidtion).
In this context, a definite article is needed to specify a certain "condition".

In general contexts, "on conditions that ..." may be used, dependign on contexts.

I can loan you my laptop on [the] conditions that you return it tomorrow in working order, and before I go to school. We can leave out the definite article if we pluralize "conditions" which mean more than one.
  1. BBC News - Saudi TV presenters break new ground by wearing niqab


    Dec 9, 2009 ... The station was launched in 2008, and last month it set a precedent by allowing women to present, but only on the condition that they wear ...news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/8368242.stm - Cached
  • Leading article: A saga that reflects badly on the Conservative ...


    Mar 2, 2010 ... For one thing, when Mr Ashcroft was made a peer in 2000 on the condition that he became a UK resident, there was no mention of the curious ...www.independent.co.uk/.../leading-article-a-saga-that-reflects-badly--on-the-conservative-party-1914316.html - Cached
  • Hi Nick,

    A few comments.

    First, your original question is addressed here, using a British site. Your reference to a pub made it sound as though that might be your preference.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/grammar/learnit/learnitv297.shtml
    It clearly shows "on condition that" without the "the." (I would have used "the" myself, but there you go. We're both wrong.)

    Second,
    AnonymousHimself and our friend said ..."
    That has to be a "He and our friend" not "Himself."

    And lastly, I would never omit the "the" in your sample sentence ""I'm going pub for a bit." Do you really hear that? Do you think that's regional, or do you think it's just such fast speech that you hear incorrectly, or you think they are really dropping the article?

    Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
    Grammar GeekAnd lastly, I would never omit the "the" in your sample sentence ""I'm going pub for a bit." Do you really hear that? Do you think that's regional, or do you think it's just such fast speech that you hear incorrectly, or you think they are really dropping the article?
    I would agree -- it also needs "to." "I'm going to the pub." I could imagine shortening or slurring them, (I'm going t'th' pub) but not omitting them entirely.
    "On the condition that" is used in US English. I have only seen "on condition that" in British source texts.
    And I've never heard "on conditions that..."
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    Firstly, you can't use 'himself' like that, it's reflexive. You mean 'our friend and he said' or 'He and our friend said'.

    Secondly, if it's 'on condition OF' then it's fine to leave out the 'the', if it's 'on the condition THAT' then you need the 'the'.

    Finally, it's never correct to drop the 'the' as in 'I'm going pub' unless you are from Essex. But it is still incorrect.

    Given the first and final points, it's odd you are caught up on correct use of 'on the condition' where not many people mind either usage!